Onondaga County Health Department

Fewer children in Syracuse exposed to lead

The number of children exposed to lead in the city of Syracuse has dropped significantly in recent years. The problem that leads to lead poisoning in cities like Syracuse is the old housing stock. Before 1978, lead paint was often used to paint homes. 90 percent of housing in the city can have lead paint that needs remediating.

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Hospitals and health plans are increasingly using the huge amount of medical data they collect for research. It's a business worth billions of dollars, and sometimes those discoveries can be the foundation of new profit-making products and companies.

When a company profits from your data, should you get a cut?

This isn't just a hypothetical question. When Steven Petrow was 26 years old, back in 1984, he was treated for testicular cancer at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

Colorado voters next month will decide how close is too close when it comes to oil and gas drilling. A statewide ballot measure known as Proposition 112 would keep new wells dramatically farther away from homes and schools, expanding the distance from a 500-foot minimum to 2,500 feet, the biggest statewide setback requirement in the country. It's a change the industry says would threaten its very existence.

Yana Kiziryan has two children. The youngest, Eddy, looks just like his cab-driving grandfather, Edward Agababian.

Edward drove a taxi in San Francisco. He loved it and dreamed of owning a medallion. These little tin permits used to be awarded on seniority. But to try to balance its transportation budget after the 2008 financial crisis, San Francisco started selling the medallions for 250,000 dollars a pop.

This was still a good deal. With a medallion, drivers could make between 5 and 7 grand a month. So Edward took out a loan and bought one.

Updated at 5:22 p.m. ET

After Hurricane Michael slammed through the Florida panhandle and into Georgia last week, President Trump has surveyed damage and met with officials about recovery efforts.

At a briefing alongside Florida Gov. Rick Scott at Eglin Air Force Base, Trump praised the work of emergency responders and law enforcement.

"The job they've done in Florida has been incredible," he said, and described Scott as a leader who "steps up in the biggest emergencies, the biggest problems, and he gets it done."

Updated 4:08 p.m. ET

The former head of security for the Senate intelligence committee pleaded guilty to one count of lying to the FBI on Monday in federal court in Washington, D.C.

James Wolfe had been charged with three such counts, but he reached a plea agreement with the U.S. Attorney's office in exchange for leniency and to avoid a trial.

Wolfe was permitted to remain free until he's scheduled to return to court on Dec. 20 to be sentenced; he faces up to six months in prison.

It's a major milestone in the fight to recognize mental health and mental illness as global issues: a comprehensive report from the Lancet Commission on Global Mental Health, three years in the making, released this past week at a London summit with royals Prince William and Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, in attendance to show their support for the cause.

But it was not a celebratory event. Threaded throughout the 45-page report is a lament that the world is ignoring millions of suffering people.

Idaho Fish and Game Commissioner Blake Fischer is under pressure to resign, after he shared photos from a hunting trip to Africa that showed him posing with a "family of baboons" that he said he killed.

In one photo, Fischer smiles as he props up the heads of two baboons, with a young animal sitting in another baboon's lap. The photos are part of an email that was initially acquired by the Idaho Statesman through a public information request filed with the governor's office.

Updated at 1:18 p.m. ET

To try to stave off the type of wildfires that have scorched California, Pacific Gas and Electric Co. warns it may pre-emptively turn off power for about 87,000 customers in 12 counties.

These areas are forecast to have weather conditions conducive to fires, including low humidity and gusty winds of up to 60 mph.

Esi Edugyan's new novel, Washington Black, opens on wretched terrain: The year is 1830; the location is a sugar plantation in Barbados. Our narrator, an enslaved 11-year-old boy named George Washington Black — "Wash" for short — tells us that the old master has recently died.

Wash is now standing to attention as a carriage carrying his new master arrives; he's a pale sinister-looking man named Erasmus Wilde. Looking at him, Wash comments, "He owned me, as he owned all those I lived among, not only our lives but also our deaths, and that pleased him too much."

U.S. Sen. Ben Sasse has good timing.

That's not because his new book, Them: Why We Hate Each Other — and How to Heal, comes at a time when prospective presidential candidates are starting to publish arguments for their potential 2020 bids (the Nebraska Republican hasn't ruled out a run, but he's said it's unlikely.)

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