WRVO News

NYS Senate candidates Rachel May and Janet Burman debate on the Campbell Conversations

The upcoming midterm elections are the most closely watched midterms in at least a generation. In New York, control of the state Senate hangs in the balance. Republicans hold a slim one seat majority in the chamber, and one race could flip control of the Senate to the Democrats. This week, Grant Reeher moderates a debate between the two candidates running in the 53rd District: Democrat Rachel May, who defeated 7 term incumbent Dave Valesky in a September primary , and Republican Janet Burman.

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More than a week after Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida panhandle, cities and towns are facing the daunting task of trying to rebuild. The recovery is hampered by catastrophic damage not only to homes and businesses, but to vital infrastructure as well.

The small Gulf coast town of Port St. Joe, with a population of about 3,500 residents, is one of countless communities that was hit by the storm.

"Everywhere you turn and go you see some kind of destruction," says the town's mayor, Bo Patterson. "Whether it was wind damage, whether it was water, one of the two."

Eight-year-old Lucy Gray is wide-eyed and quivering with anticipation when I arrive at her house in suburban Maryland. I am sorry to report that I am not the object of her excitement. She is thrilled because she will soon be cooking with my companion, Molly Birnbaum, editor in chief of America's Test Kitchen Kids.

President Trump said the U.S. will withdraw from a decades-old treaty with Russia that eliminated a class of nuclear weapons after he accused Russia of violating the treaty.

"We're the ones that have stayed in the agreement and we've honored the agreement, but Russia has not unfortunately honored the agreement," Trump told reporters in Nevada, "so we're going to terminate the agreement, we're going to pull out."

A new study of women with ovarian cancer shows that ignorance about the condition is common among patients in all 44 countries surveyed. And that ignorance has a cost.

The Los Angeles Dodgers outlasted the Milwaukee Brewers 5-1 in the deciding Game 7 of the National League Championship Series Saturday night.

With the win, the Dodgers will return to the World Series for the second year in a row, to face off against the Boston Red Sox — and look to rewrite last year's fate, after losing Game 7 of the World Series to the Houston Astros.

Anticipation is growing along with the zeros in the Mega Millions lottery winnings. The prize hit $1.6 billion after no one won the jackpot in a drawing on Friday night.

That's the largest lottery jackpot in history, surpassing the $1.586 billion Powerball prize in January 2016.

Mega Millions lead director Gordon Medenica called it "uncharted territory."

A winner who wants the money in a lump sum can opt for the cash option of about $905 million.

The next drawing will be on Tuesday at 11 p.m. ET.

The World Bank predicts climate change could create as many as 143 million "climate migrants" by 2050. The result would be a mass migration twice as large as the number of refugees in the world today.

Thanks to the Internet, you can buy just about anything online and have it shipped to you in a few days or less.

The process is reminiscent of the early 1900s, when people turned to mail-order catalogs to find things to buy. And — amazingly, for the time — they could even order homes via catalog.

Monash University / Flickr

When it comes to medicine, the understanding of what is best for a patient can change over time due to new advances made in research, clinical trials and the like. Even so, many practices and products are adopted with little testing, leading to what a hematologist-oncologist at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) described as a vast amount of medical reversals.

Dr. Vinay Prasad joined us to discuss medical reversal on "Take Care," he's an associate professor of medicine at OHSU and co-author of the book “Ending Medical Reversal: Improving outcomes, saving lives.” In his book, he wrote that there are a lot of practices in medicine that are adopted quickly and used for long periods of time when, in fact, they are ineffective or even harmful.

Rob Bertholf / Flickr

Decades ago, people got their health information from their doctors. Today, information is much more available (thanks, internet). So much so that we're bombarded by it: lose weight forever with this one simple trick; here's the cleanse that will cure your bloat; don't lie awake in bed at night, take this supplement, cure insomnia. Many of these tips, tricks, cures and secrets are misleading and inaccurate, spread by celebrities and laypeople alike.

Timothy Caulfield has spent most of his career trying to find out if there's any evidence behind these wellness trends. He joins us on "Take Care" to dispel some myths and get to the root of the problem. Caulfield is a researcher, author and professor of health law and science policy at the University of Alberta. He's host of the show "A User's Guide to Cheating Death," which is available on Netflix.

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