Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

When the sun rose over California on Friday, it found a state substantially changed from just a week ago. A pair of wildfires, both to the north and south, have killed dozens of people, left hundreds more missing and reduced the entire community of Paradise to smoldering ash and ruin.

Amid all the destruction, life goes on, albeit substantially changed.

Updated at 12:00 p.m. ET

The U.S. government may be preparing criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, according to suggestions in a document filed in an unrelated case.

Assange's name appeared at least twice in papers filed in the Eastern District Court of Virginia, both times appearing to say that Assange has already been made the subject of his own case.

Prosecutors in Virginia say the court document was an error.

Updated at 1:22 p.m. ET

Already reeling from a string of protests and resignations, British Prime Minister Theresa May is fighting for more than the draft Brexit deal she has negotiated with the European Union. With a mutiny afoot within her own Conservative Party, the prime minister may be battling for her political life, as well.

Updated at 9:13 a.m. ET on Thursday

Hours after British Prime Minister Theresa May announced a tentative deal charting the United Kingdom's exit from the European Union and assuring the public that her Cabinet supported it, two key ministers abruptly quit her government in protest over the proposed pact.

The first to call it quits was Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab, who said in a letter of resignation that he could not "in good conscience" support the draft deal. Not long after, Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey followed suit.

With just months to go before the U.K. leaves the European Union, the two governments have agreed on a draft of what exactly that withdrawal will look like. The British prime minister's office announced the tentative agreement Tuesday without offering details about the deal hashed out with EU negotiators in Brussels.

The specifics will likely surface only after members of the U.K. Cabinet are consulted. Any agreement requires the approval of Parliament as well as all 27 remaining EU member states.

Less than three weeks after Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena shocked the country by sacking his prime minister and suspending Parliament, his bid to consolidate power has hit a major speed bump: the country's Supreme Court.

Updated Saturday at 9 a.m. ET

Officials in California say that nine people have died in the fast-moving Camp Fire near the small town of Paradise, Calif., population 27,000, which has been all but wiped off the map and its buildings reduced to ruin.

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

Sgt. Ron Helus was on the phone with his wife when the reports of gunfire started streaming into the Ventura County Sheriff's Office. It was around 11:20 p.m. PT Wednesday, and a gunman had opened fire at the Borderline Bar & Grill.

The Catholic Church in Guam has announced plans to file Chapter 11 bankruptcy, in an attempt to cope with the scores of sexual abuse claims against clergy in the U.S. territory. Archbishop Michael Byrnes said the Archdiocese of Agana settled on the move as the most expedient way to support the alleged victims.

Updated Nov. 8 at 1:48 p.m. ET

As Election Day gave way to the early morning hours Wednesday, the bruising, often bitter race to become Georgia's next governor continued to defy a ready resolution. With nearly all votes counted, Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp enjoyed a slim lead — but his defiant Democratic opponent, former state lawmaker Stacey Abrams, has vowed to push on in hopes of a runoff election.

Roughly two days remain until the full measure of U.S. sanctions snap back into place against Iran. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told reporters Friday that, come 12 a.m. ET Monday, the economic penalties leveled on the Iranian regime will return to levels unseen since the U.S. negotiated the 2015 multilateral nuclear deal.

The Trump administration has called for a cease-fire in Yemen, where years of violence have left thousands dead and millions more facing full-blown famine. Both Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis asked combatants to come to the negotiating table for peace talks within a month.

Deep in western India, a giant larger than any other awaits its imminent welcome to the world. The Statue of Unity, a 600-foot monument to a founding father of independent India, is set to be inaugurated Wednesday.

Presumably that will leave just enough time to finish scrolling through all of the photograph below.

The U.S. Agency for Global Media has launched an investigation into an anti-Semitic television segment attacking George Soros that aired on a federally funded Spanish-language broadcaster.

The 15-minute segment, which Radio and Television Martí broadcast in May, calls the billionaire philanthropist a "multimillionaire Jew" who uses his profits to "finance anti-system [political] movements that fill his pockets."

Just days after Sri Lanka's president abruptly dismissed its prime minister and his cabinet, replacing him with a former leader, the country's upper echelons of power appear deadlocked in an increasingly bitter tug-of-war. Many lawmakers are decrying the move as unconstitutional, and those calls only grew louder when President Maithripala Sirisena suspended Parliament over the weekend.

Updated at 4:09 p.m. ET

Former President Jimmy Carter has personally urged the Republican candidate for governor in Georgia to resign from his position overseeing the state's elections. Carter lodged his appeal to Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp in a letter dated last Monday and first obtained by The Associated Press.

Gritty is an icon for our troubled times.

Three books have emerged with one of the world's most lucrative literary awards. At a ceremony Thursday in Austin, Texas, judges named the winners of the Kirkus Prize — the select few plucked from among 1,193 books published in the past year.

Ling Ma's novel Severance took home the prize for fiction. Call Them by Their True Names, an essay collection by Rebecca Solnit, won in the nonfiction category. And the picture book Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut earned the young readers' literature prize for author Derrick Barnes and illustrator Gordon C. James.

The United Nations' humanitarian chief warned a month ago that war-torn Yemen was on the brink of a "massive loss of life" — a famine-fueled catastrophe that may spell the complete collapse of an already failing country.

Since then, he says the dire situation has only gotten worse.

More than a mile beneath the surface of the Black Sea, shrouded in darkness, an ancient ship sat for millennia unseen by human eyes — until the Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project happened upon its watery grave last year.

The team announced the find Tuesday, saying its discovery has been "confirmed as the oldest intact shipwreck known to mankind." Radiocarbon-dated to roughly 400 B.C., the trading vessel plied the waves in the days of Plato and Sophocles, when the city-states of ancient Greece had scattered colonies all around the Black Sea.

Updated at 5:55 a.m. ET Wednesday

The U.S. intends to follow through on President Trump's threat to leave a Cold War-era nuclear arms treaty with Russia. National Security Adviser John Bolton confirmed the plan Tuesday in Moscow, not long after speaking with Russian President Vladimir Putin in person about the decision.

Updated at 2:59 p.m. ET

As a vast train of migrants treks across Mexico, fleeing violence and poverty for the fate that awaits them at the U.S. border, President Trump is vowing that there will be repercussions for the countries that have allowed their passage.

Updated at 11:54 p.m. ET

Nearly two weeks since Jamal Khashoggi vanished in Istanbul, the shadow of the Saudi journalist's disappearance continues to loom ever larger. Now, President Trump is threatening "severe punishment" for Saudi Arabia if suspicions of Khashoggi's murder are confirmed — and Saudis have vowed to retaliate in kind.

Things have not exactly been great lately for Angela Merkel.

The German chancellor's fragile governing coalition nearly unraveled over questions of migration policy this summer, and her conservatives slid to record lows in opinion polls not long afterward.

When German organizers pulled together a demonstration in Berlin to support "an open and free society," they had some ambitious goals. They expected roughly 40,000 people to pack the span from Berlin's city center, from Alexanderplatz to the Victory Column, where they were holding their final rally of the day.

As it turns out, those expectations didn't measure up to the real thing.

Pope Francis has expelled two retired Chilean clerics from the priesthood. In a statement Saturday, the Vatican announced that the two men, Archbishop Emeritus Francisco José Cox Huneeus and Bishop Emeritus Marco Antonio Órdenes Fernández, were defrocked "as a consequence of manifest abuse of minors."

The Vatican said the move made Thursday by the pontiff cannot be appealed.

Updated at 4:13 p.m. ET

Andrew Brunson is back on U.S. soil.

After two years of detention in Turkey, during which the American pastor's fate drove a wedge between two longtime allies, a newly-freed Brunson touched down Saturday at Joint Base Andrews just outside Washington, D.C. From there, Brunson stopped by the White House for a visit with President Trump.

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