Public Radio Presents

Sundays 7 p.m.

Public Radio Presents is a rotating collection of some of the best productions in public radio. Any given Sunday you'll hear debates, storytelling, historical programming, panel discussions, documentaries, and more. Past programs have included: Intelligence Squared US, America Abroad, State of the Re:Union, Destination DIY, Here's the Thing with Alec Baldwin, and locally produced documentaries and panel discussions.

Have a suggestion for this rotating block? Let us know.

APM Reports

Mario Martinez and Katy Sorto were the first in their families to go to college. They started at community college in 2008 hoping to earn degrees, but the odds were against them. Both are from low-income families, they ended up in remedial classes, and they knew almost no one who had been to college. This APM Reports documentary tells their remarkable stories 10 years later and provides a rare window on the personal experience of trying to move up through education.

Join us Sunday, September 9 at 7 p.m. on WRVO.

APM Reports

As part of a series on education from APM Reports, we're airing documentaries for the first four weeks in September on Public Radio Presents. For the first in the series, we ask if colleges help Americans move up into a higher socioeconomic class.

By connecting people across the world for free, platforms like Twitter and Facebook set the stage for a promising digital revolution, providing tools that helped foster global friendships, break down long-standing barriers that kept people and ideas from being heard, and served as the ultimate democratizing force for information.

Removing barriers to health

Aug 13, 2018
eltpics / Flickr

Health and wellness isn't a right for all people. For many of us, it's a privilege. Whether the issue is cost, transportation, resources or red tape -- many things can get in the way of living a long, health life. This time on "Take Care," we speak to people who are trying to remove these barriers.

APM Reports returns with a three-part series in July and August. Join us starting Sunday, July 29 for "Order 9066: Japanese American Incarceration in WWII."

On February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, just months after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Some 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry were forced from their homes on the West Coast and sent to one of ten "relocation" camps, where they were imprisoned behind barbed wire for the length of the war. Two-thirds of them were American citizens.

the unnamed / Flickr

When we set out to put together this episode of "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show, we were told over and over again that there wasn't a lot known about the topic we wanted to explore -- the brain. The brain is infinitely complex. What we do know about the brain we've learned from neuroscientists, biologists and psychologists -- and they're continuing to make ground-breaking discoveries daily about how the organ works and what that means for our health and wellness. Needless to say, we took a stab at it anyway!

Is Bitcoin here to stay, or is it a bubble waiting to pop? Less than a decade old, Bitcoin is worth billions. The cryptocurrency promises to revolutionize global finance by placing control of currency in the hands of users, not nations, and make financial exchanges more transparent, efficient, and democratic. And it seems to be taking hold: Earlier this year both the Cboe and CME debuted Bitcoin futures. But is Bitcoin really a safe bet?

Have you ever been to the Third Coast Institute of Sound? Probably not. It's a dreamed-up fictional museum where all of the exhibits and artifacts are dedicated to things that make sound and noise.

On this special, the history of the cat piano goes back centuries and raises unanswered (and perhaps unanswerable) questions about the relationship between music and noise, human and animal.

Celebrate the July 4th holiday and pick up a few new legal explanations from Rudy Guiliana when the "Capitol Steps" poke fun at today's news with a brand new, one-hour special.

Call your friends! Call your lawyer! Call your lawyer's lawyer! The special promises to be huge, fantastic, tremendous... the highest ratings ever, believe me. If there's anything both sides can agree on, it's that we all could use a good laugh. Tune out and tune in as the "Capitol Steps" rhyme the news of the day.

atelier PRO / Flickr

On the next "Take Care," we're exploring the health of our children. Looking at the issue from mental and physical perspectives, we hear from a variety of experts on the topic. It should be no surprise that today's youngest generation is growing up differently than the generations before them.

From WBEZ Chicago, Making Obama tells the story of Barack Obama’s climb from the South Side of Chicago to the national stage. Host Jennifer White talks with Obama’s key advisors, mentors, rivals, and the former President himself.

Part One: Obama’s years as a community organizer to his first elected office in Springfield, Illinois.

Part Two: Obama’s ill-advised run for Congress in 2000 to the moment he arrived on the national stage.

Negotiations can denuclearize North Korea. That's the statement two teams will debate in this week's "Intelligence Squared U.S." How should the United States respond to North Korea’s rapidly advancing nuclear capabilities?

Some experts suggest the upcoming summit between President Trump and Kim Jong-un might provide a pivotal diplomatic opportunity to persuade North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons -- especially in light of the announcement of harsh new sanctions.

The final year of World War II in the Pacific, told by men who came back and kept silent about the harrowing ordeal that changed their lives.

All Mom Radio

May 9, 2018

For Mother’s Day, maternal tales from producers around the country:

“Travels with Mom” follows Larry Massett and his mother to the Tybee Island, Georgia of today and of the 1920′s, as recalled by Mrs. Massett.

Writer Beverly Donofrio joins her mom for “Thursday Night Bingo,” produced by Dave Isay of Sound Portraits.

In Nancy Updike‘s “Mubarak and Margy,” a gay man returns home to care for his mom, and to the “cure” his family plans for his homosexuality.

And comedian Amy Borkowsky shares her hilarious phone “Messages from Mom.”

What if a single policy could impact American democracy, culture, and competitiveness?  What if that policy might either empower citizens and consumers, or burden them?  And what if the decision on that policy sparked a frenzy of legislative proposals, judicial challenges, and citizen outrage, all across the country?

Cindy Shebley / Flickr

On this episode of "Take Care" we're exploring addiction and the opioid crisis. It's a topic on the minds of health professionals, community leaders, elected officials and citizens across the country. Some cities and states have been hit particularly hard, others are working proactively to give their residents options for recovery. It's a complicated issue that we're looking at from a few different angles.

From BBC World Service's "The Compass," scientist Liz Bonnin offers a deep dive into the Earth's oceans. From Mauritius to Alaska, the Philippines to Cape Town, she shares stories of people who make a living from the sea and its wildlife, capturing the powerful ties that bind so many of us to the awesome majesty of the oceans.

Join us this Sunday, April 15 at 7 p.m. and again on April 29 at 7 p.m. for this two-part series in celebration of Earth Day.

King's Last March

Mar 28, 2018

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Half a century later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

"King's Last March" includes interviews with some of the leader's closest colleagues and advisors, who reflect on the last year of his life, and the last protest movement of his career. It's a powerful and moving exploration of the final chapter of King's life that offers audiences reflection on the 50th anniversary of his death.

NPR's "Embedded" team returns with two programs on the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Host Kelly McEvers reports on two key questions explored by Special Counsel Robert Mueller for the next two Sundays on WRVO.

Collusion | Sunday, March 11 at 7 p.m.

The BBC World Service presents remarkable stories of women's history, told by the women who were there. Selected from its Witness program, audiences will hear the story of the first women to vote in Kuwait; meet the woman who took the x-ray that revealed the structure of DNA; and hear how one woman's experience of 'date rape' changed the discourse around sexual violence in America.

Tune in this Sunday, March 4 at 7 p.m. for this broadcast of "Witness."

Witness the antics of The Capitol Steps, Jay Leno, Dennis Miller, George Carlin, Chevy Chase, and John Toomey. Hear Stan Freberg lampoon George Washington, James Whitmore play Harry Truman, Charlie Warren impersonate Jimmy Carter, and Rich Little play Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan.

"Take Care" returns this weekend with our first show of 2018. We'll be exploring the theme of giving from a health and wellness perspective this hour with a handful of very engaging guests.

By most accounts, the American economy is booming — manufacturing is at a 13-year high, unemployment is at a 16-year low, and both the stock market and consumer confidence are soaring. But just what is driving this upturn? And can Americans trust that current economic conditions will hold up in the months ahead?

In Intelligence Squared U.S.’s first debate of this season, five esteemed economic thinkers debate the state of the American economy, from tax cuts to trade policy.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Coming up this week, a special broadcast with Diane Rehm.

A year after President Trump's inauguration, Diane talks with a panel of top political analysts about how the country has changed since his election, and what's ahead for the White House, Congress and voters in 2018.

Tune in this Friday, January 19 at 1 p.m. and again Sunday, January 21 at 7 p.m. for this special broadcast. You can find more details about "One Year Under Trump" on WAMU's website.

Join us this weekend, and next, for the winners of the 17th annual Third Coast/Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Competition.

From more than 600 entries, eleven were chosen as winners. The stories are meticulously crafted and lovingly produced -- they intrigue, inform and inspire. The program also features interviews with some of the exceptional producers.

We'll hear the best from Third Coast this weekend and next on WRVO, Sunday, January 7 and 14 at 7 p.m. If you missed the live broadcast, you can listen online.

A Christmas Carol

Dec 20, 2017
Jim, the Photographer / Flickr

Hear the ghosts of Christmas come alive this holiday season with this special radio adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic "A Christmas Carol."

Children and adults alike will enjoy this rendition of this heart-warming Christmas favorite. The myriad of sound effects and musical cues put the listener right there with the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future.

Tune in December 24 at 7 p.m. for "A Christmas Carol" on WRVO.

Timothy K Hamilton / Flickr

Enjoy this hour of mixes and mashes and season samples and songs.

First, Christmas at Bagram Air Base hospital in Afghanistan, a tour of the Holy Land with Hanukkah military history, a visit to a toy store and some musical Chrismashups.

Tune in this Sunday, December 17 at 7 p.m. on WRVO. If you missed the on-air broadcast, you can still listen online.

Shelby U / Flickr

Join us for an hour of rarely-heard holiday music highlighting artists, arrangements, lyrics and compositions from today and yesterday.

Hear John Denver with "Christmas Like a Lullaby," Mannheim Steamroller with "Carol of the Birds," and much more, from the classical to the modern. A full list of songs featured on "An Unfamiliar Christmas" is available online.

Tune in this Sunday, December 10 at 7 p.m. on WRVO for "An Unfamiliar Christmas."

Join us for an NPR News special this weekend exploring the latest sexual harassment allegations and admissions.

It's been a little more than a year since President Trump, then candidate-Trump, faces furious criticism over the now infamous Access Hollywood video featuring his comments about groping women. He subsequently faced a barrage of sexual harassment claims. While the moment sparked a national conversation about sexual harassment, it did not quash his Presidential aspirations.

This history special traces the development of racial, and racist, ideas. We’ll start in the ancient world, when "there was no notion of race," as historian Nell Irvin Painter puts it, and continue to the founding of the United States as, fundamentally, a nation of and for white people.

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