Take Care

Some Sundays at 7 p.m.

A conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email the production team at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

WRVO allows republishing of Take Care web posts at no charge, with the following provisions:  a) no editing of scripts, graphics or audio is allowed;  b) "WRVO Public Media" shall be credited on the republished post; and c) notification of intent to republish a post is emailed to TakeCare@wrvo.org.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

Influenza: Facts, myths and prevention

Mar 24, 2018
Daniel Paquet / Flickr

As we set out to examine influenza on "Take Care," we wanted to start out with the basics. Flu is one of those illnesses that carries with it a lot of baggage in the form of myths and tall tales. After all, hasn't anyone ever told you that you can get the flu from the vaccine? (You can't.)

Dr. Angela Campbell, medical officer in the influenza division of the CDC, joined us to share her insight into this year's flu virus and how to prevent contracting it.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

The worst flu season in nearly a decade has taken a toll on the nation's hospitals. The facilities have been on the front lines, dealing with a flood of patients that in some areas has reached crisis levels. In New Jersey and Alabama, some hospitals have needed triage tents just to process the surge of patients.

That hasn't been the case in Syracuse, but the rise in flu cases has swamped some local emergency departments, causing a ripple effect.

Smile Train

This statement, and others, dot the website of Smile Train -- a charitable organization treating cleft lip and cleft palate in the developing world. These conditions can cause complications in speech, eating and even breathing.

eSight Eyewear

It’s not easy to keep up with the latest in health and wellness. Each day, new studies, research and developments in health make it difficult to pick out the most important information for you.

We’ll be sharing a few of the latest developments in health at the end of each episode of “Take Care” this year. As the year goes on, we may even revisit some earlier news to see where things stand months later.

Today we’re covering a couple of interesting ways that health is intersecting technology and the first is quite a breakthrough.

Is corporate America driving your charitable donations?

Feb 4, 2018
audreyjm529 / Flickr

Not all pink ribbons are created equal, according to the "Take Care" guest we're speaking to today.

Dr. Mara Einstein is a researcher, author and professor at Queens College, CUNY, who dissects the effects of marketing on society and on ourselves. Her latest book is “Black Ops Advertising: Native Ads, Content Marketing and the Covert World of the Digital Sell.”

A blood donor on his incredible commitment

Feb 3, 2018
Red Cross

For decades, the Red Cross has been encouraging people to give blood, especially during times of hardship. When Jerry Ball was in his teens, he heard that call and he’s been giving ever since. Jerry has donated blood over 200 times -- 268 times, to be exact.

“You can donate whole blood every 56 days, so I just sign up every 56 days,” Jerry says.

When Jerry was growing up, it was the 1970s. There was a war going on. The need was there. That’s why he started his commitment to donating.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Resources for families with young children can be scarce, from diapers to milk. Often, there is no government assistance to help struggling families with these necessities. But there are grassroots organizations that step up at the local level to help new families. 

Allison Brooks of the Salvation Army in Syracuse said the need for diapers hit home for her a few years ago when she was working at a food pantry.

For the past six years, the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York has supported health and wellness programming on WRVO. While the vehicle has changed over the years, from community forums to weekly shows and hour-long specials, they’ve been committed to supporting our effects to bring listeners the latest in health and wellness news that affects your community and your life.

Jeremy Costello / Flickr

Pets give you love and affection but can they be good for your health? Not only do pets bring people together but they can prolong your life and fill the need people have to take care of something, according to this week's guest.

Studies have shown that pets can be a driving force in patients doing better and living longer. Mayo Clinic Oncologist Dr. Edward Creagan joins us on "Take Care" to discuss how pets impact our lives -- potentially more than we impact theirs.

Ray García / Flickr

Music from your past has the ability to "take you back" and music therapy may be able to do the same. People who haven’t spoken in years can sing lyrics and even immobile patients are able to tap along to the rhythm of familiar music. This week, how music therapy is able to tap into the brains of those with speech and motor disorders caused by Alzheimer’s, dementia, stroke, and traumatic brain injury.

Dr. Concetta Tomaino was one of the first music therapists in the world and remains to be a pioneer in the field. She worked with Dr. Oliver Sacks; a renowned neurologist to found the Institute for Music and Neurologic Function, where she continues to serve as executive director. She joins us on "Take Care" to discuss her work in music therapy and how it's improving people's lives.

yimix / Flickr

One of the first decisions you have to make after finding out you are having a baby is the type of birth you are going to have. There are many options, from a traditional hospital birth to one in a birthing center. Some mothers even consider a home birth if complications don't seem to be on the horizon. Either way, choosing one right for your situation could be a daunting task. Joining us this week on "Take Care" is Dr. Jill Hechtman, she is the medical director of Tampa Obstetrics. We'll breaks down each birthing method, plus the advantages and disadvantages of each.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

Over the past decade, there has been an uptick in children with peanut allergies. The usual recommendation is children that are high risk for the allergy to avoid all peanut products before the age of three. A recent study is challenging the idea of total peanut avoidance. The LEAP study has come out with new guidelines that might prevent high risk children from developing the allergy.

Dr. Gerald Nepom is the emeritus director of Benaroya Research Institute and has published over 350 scientific papers in the areas of immunology, genetics and autoimmunity. He joins us to explain LEAP, the study’s findings, and the new guidelines on peanut allergies.

Denise Krebs / Flickr

Over the past decade, there has been an uptick in children with peanut allergies. The usual recommendation is children that are high risk for the allergy to avoid all peanut products before the age of three. A recent study is challenging the idea of total peanut avoidance. The LEAP study has come out with new guidelines that might prevent high risk children from developing the allergy.

 

A safe and happy holiday is within reach

Dec 9, 2017
Isabell Hubert / flickr

The much-anticipated holiday season is full of joy, but it’s also full of dashing through the snow to the mall with a cold to get some last-minute gifts. It’s seeing relatives you wished you could spend time with more often and some you wish you could write off altogether. And while setting up your Christmas light display makes the grandkids happy, it also means getting up on your very steep roof.

Like anything, the holiday season has pros and cons. In this holiday special, we’ll try to get you off on the right foot. Whether it’s staying healthy, keeping track of your finances in this busy spending time, or focusing on the positive when you’re hosting 20 relatives for dinner -- there are ways to start off 2018 relatively unscathed. First, we’ll focus on physical health.

For most people the holidays are a happy and healthy time, but some people do end up in the emergency room. Injuries seen in emergency facilities around the holidays include falls, cuts and back pain, among others. Most occur because, around the holidays, people are doing things they don't normally -- like reaching for heavy boxes in the attic.

This week on a special hour-long edition of "Take Care," we examine some holiday-related injuries with Dr. Michael Boniface, an emergency room doctor at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida.

Rubbertoe (Robert Batina) / Flickr

Most contact sports today require players to wear a helmet. Cyclists and skiers wear them to protect from serious injury if they fall. While helmet technology has come a long way, there is still a push to make sure that they are providing as much protection as possible.

Dr. Stefan Duma is a professor of engineering and the founding director of the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest Center for Injury Biomechanics. Duma joins us to discuss his research and the STAR safety rating system given to hockey and football helmets.

Concussions early in life could have lasting effects

Dec 2, 2017
bucaorg (Paul Burnett) / Flickr

When it comes to playing sports, professionals aren’t the only ones taking hits to the head. Kids and teens are also taking hard hits that could have a lasting impact later in life. While new technology can help minimize concussions, there is no sure way to prevent them.  

Dr. Barry Kosofsky joins us this week to discuss new methods in concussion diagnosis and to provide an update on the latest effects of traumatic brain injury. Kosofsky is the director of the Pediatric Concussion Clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian Hospital. He's a top expert on concussions.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr

Anyone who has played a contact sport, like football or hockey, has had to wear a helmet. The same is true for other sports, like cycling and skiing. Helmets reduce the risk of severe head trauma if an injury does occur. Helmets worn by football players in the 1920s were made of leather and provided little protection. Today, helmets have several layers of padding, surrounded by a plastic or polycarbonate shell. 

Orthorexia: When healthy eating becomes dangerous

Nov 25, 2017
Marco Verch / Flickr

Many people have heard of anorexia nervosa, the eating disorder related to restricting the amount you eat, but many people haven’t heard of orthorexia. Orthorexia refers to compulsive healthy eating. While it isn’t clinically diagnosed yet, healthcare professionals are pushing for more research due to the problems it may cause.

Dr. Rebecca Sokal and Dr. Yon Park are fourth year psychiatry residents at the University of Maryland Sheppard Pratt Health System. Sokal and Park presented their research on orthorexia at the American Psychiatric Association meeting in 2017. They join us today to discuss the disorder and why further research is important.

Stacey Spensley / Flickr

Chia Pets and chia seeds have been a gag gift staple for decades, but are they a kitchen staple in your home? Chia seeds can be used to boost the nutritional value or as a replacement of foods you eat every day. Registered dietician Megan Ware, who founded Nutrition Awareness, joins us to discuss this superfood and how we can incorporate it into our everyday diet.

Can 'clean eating' be taken too far?

Nov 24, 2017
Sebastian Celis / Flickr

Most of us have heard of the eating disorder anorexia. Not as familiar is the term orthorexia, which is characterized by an obsession with proper nutrition, food quality and healthy eating. For someone fixated on "clean eating" avoidance of what they perceive as "unhealthy" food can result in the development of extreme, restrictive diets. 

Managing diabetes at school

Nov 18, 2017
Alan Levine / Flickr

Many students only see their school nurse when they are faking a headache to get out of class, but some of their classmates rely on the nurse to manage their health throughout the day. School nurses play a vital role in assisting students with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes through the day, especially as Type 2 diabetes in on the rise as childhood obesity rates increase.

Margaret Pellizzari is a diabetes educator and registered nurse who joins us on "Take Care" to discuss how childhood diabetes is managed in school.

tkraska / Flickr

As adults, we know to make sure we're taking care of ourselves and reducing our risk for things like heart disease, heart attack and stroke. But a recent study found one group of children may be more at risk due to their social and economic status. The study found that disadvantaged children have a thicker carotid artery wall -- which can lead to things like heart disease and other problems later in life.

Dr. Clyde Yancy is the chief of cardiology in the Department of Medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. He joins us today to clear up the study’s findings and discuss how we can give all children the opportunity to be healthy.

How school nurses handle kids with diabetes

Nov 17, 2017
Sprogz / Flickr

The role of the school nurse has changed over the last few decades. Childhood obesity is on the rise and so are the number of kids with Type 2 diabetes. That means school nurses often have to administer insulin and other medications on a daily basis. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen talk with Margaret Pellizzari, a registered nurse and diabetes educator. Pellizzari is also program coordinator and assistant nurse manager in pediatric endocrinology at Cohen Children’s Medical Center on Long Island, New York.

Smartphone-related hand injuries and how to reduce them

Nov 11, 2017
Hamaza Butt / Flickr

Repeated use of anything can cause wear and tear including your smartphone. Continued scrolling and tapping can wear down the tendons in your hand and wrist causing injury. Repetitive use injuries are common in older adults but health professionals are seeing injury in younger patients as the age smartphone use decreases. 

Dr. Daniel Polatsch, an orthopedic hand surgeon and co-director of the New York Hand and Wrist Center of Lenox Hill, joins us this week to discuss how extended use of smartphones can cause injury and how to reduce the risk of it.

Online database makes medical studies more available

Nov 11, 2017
Sebastian / Flickr

Traditional medical journals allow doctors and researchers to find information on different medical conditions. These articles might take months or even years to publish, after a critical review process, and the journals in which their published often carry high subscription costs.

One doctor is trying to change the way medical information is published. Dr. John Adler, the neurosurgeon who invented the Cyberknife system, has created a new website to make it easier for doctors to publish and look up case studies or medical articles. He joins us today to discuss Cureus.com and how it’s changing the way people access medical information.

CPR: Why it's important to be up to date on training

Nov 4, 2017
Adrian Midgley / Flickr

Someone collapses and goes into cardiac arrest in public, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is crucial for that persons survival yet only one in five adults are current on CPR training. And training may not be as available to some people as it is to others.

Our guest Dr. Benjamin Abella is a professor of emergency medicine and the director of the Center for Resuscitation Science at the University of Pennsylvania. He joins us to discuss how CPR affects survival rates in patients who go into cardiac arrest and how important it is that you are trained.

Alcohol and its effect on your liver

Nov 4, 2017
Simon Scarfe / Flickr

Your liver works hard to rid your body of toxins that may come from your diet and the environment. One of those toxins is very common and is willingly ingested on a regular basis. Alcohol, if consumed in moderation, doesn’t pose any risk to your liver. Excessive drinking, though, over long periods of time, can cause problems.

Dr. Shannon Bailey, a professor of pathology and environmental health sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham joins us today to discuss how alcohol affects the liver in the long term.

Why don't more people know CPR?

Nov 3, 2017
Tommy Campbell Photography / American Heart Association 2017

If someone near you required had a cardiac event and needed CPR, would you know how to do it? If so, you would be part of just 20 percent of adults that are trained in CPR. If it's such an important lifesaving skill, why don't more people learn how it's done? This week on WRVO’s health and wellness show Take Care, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen talk with Dr. Benjamin Abella, director of the Center for Resuscitation Science at the University of Pennsylvania.

How long joint replacements actually last

Oct 28, 2017
tompickenfrets / Flickr

Major surgery may be a last resort for most people but for those who suffer from joint pain, cartilage lo­ss, and limited mobility, a replacement surgery may be exactly what they are looking for. Knee, hip, and shoulder replacements are the most popular in the United State but the question of how long these artificial joints last still remains.

Joining us today is Dr. Richard Iorio, an orthopedic surgeon and the chief of adult reconstruction at New York University Langone Hospital for Joint Diseases to discuss the longevity of joint replacements and the risks that may come with them.

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