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SU residence hall released from quarantine after 3 students test positive for COVID-19

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Syracuse University.

More than 80 students who were in precautionary quarantine at a residence hall at Syracuse University were released late Monday, after three students tested positive for COVID-19 Sunday.

All of the students that were under quarantine live on the eighth floor of Day Hall and were tested on Sunday. The students were told to stay in their rooms. Food was delivered to them while they were quarantined. An email sent to Day Hall residents Monday night praised them for their quick response.

"We appreciate the urgent way you responded to our call to action," the email said. "Each of you quickly returned to your rooms, underwent testing and complied an followed the direction of our public health experts. It's another reminder that our students want to be here and will take the necessary steps to make that goal achievable."

SU is also in the process of testing all of the residents in Day Hall. Those test results will be available in the next day or two. Only students who live on the eighth floor were required to quarantine.

SU Vice Chancellor Mike Haynie said the chain of transmission for the three students who tested positive, is clear to the Onondaga County Health Department and not an example of community spread. He said that’s a good thing. When public health officials can’t trace the chain of transmission, he said, it’s much more problematic.

The number of active cases at SU has risen to 33 and there are 105 students in quarantine. Haynie said the university has done a good job of controlling the spread of the virus, but now is not the time to relax. 

"We're not going to go out and celebrate, I think what has been to date a success on campus because we know it could all change tomorrow," Haynie said.