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Politics and Government

Brindisi, Fogel emphasize 'experience' in bids for State Supreme Court judge

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Danielle Fogel and Anthony Brindisi are vying for a vacant State Supreme Court judge seat in central NY

Anthony Brindisi and Danielle Fogel have known each other since they were kids. Now, they’re running against each other to be the next state supreme court judge for the fifth judicial district.

While Brindisi is technically running on the democratic line, and Fogel on the Republican, they both say none of that really matters. What matters is experience.

“It's a race that's more about your experience and your qualifications, not about issues or positions,” said Brindisi.

“With judicial races, it's not a typical political scenario, where, you know, it's this back and forth, aggressive, you know, your issues, this my issues–that that's not what you get with this,” said Fogel.

Electoral campaigns are nothing new to Brindisi, a Utica lawyer for over two decades who served in both the state assembly and as a congressman. Even though nearly all of his experience is in the political sphere, he says he’s confident that he can be impartial in the courtroom.

“I know that I can be fair and listen to both sides and help solve problems on behalf of people in this community,” he said.

While Fogel is a newbie in the electoral arena, she’s also had decades of experience, specifically as a trial lawyer. She said her familiarity with the courtroom is her biggest strength.

“I truly believe experience matters,” she said. “And I have the experience and background and skill to seamlessly transition into this position.”

Both candidates have been endorsed by several people in their respective parties. Brindisi has received the endorsement of several state senators and assemblypersons including Rachel May, John Mannion, Al Stirpe, and Pam Hunter. He’s also received several endorsements from local labor unions.

Fogel has had similar endorsements from the Onondaga County Deputy Sheriff’s Police Association, Onondaga County Executive Ryan McMahon, and United States Representative Elise Stefanik.

While they may be running on different party lines, Fogel and Brindisi really do seem to be two sides of the same coin. They’re both Utica natives with young kids, lawyers by trade, and are both really prioritizing experience over anything else.

“I've dealt with everyday people from every walk of life and I know that I can be fair in the courtroom,” said Brindisi.

“My job is to apply the law,” said Fogel. “And that's what my job is, and I'll do that I'll be prepared. I will assist the parties to resolve. And that's kind of been what it's about.”

Whichever candidate wins, they’ll be one of the youngest judges to serve on the state supreme court.