climate change

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

State Senators and Assembly members are pushing for action to combat climate change before the legislative session ends later this month.

But Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the plan is too ambitious and unrealistic.

Sen. Todd Kaminsky, chair of the Senate’s Environmental Conservation committee, said he thinks that the state can enact the major anti-climate change measure between now and June 19, when the session is scheduled to end. He said there isn’t time to wait.

The global demand for milk and other dairy products is expected to increase more than 50 percent in the next 30 years, but climate change is threatening the dairy industry.

Dairy cows produce less milk and are susceptible to infertility and disease when the weather is warm.

julep67 / Flickr

In 2014, the World Health Organization said climate change will bring malaria, diarrhea, heat stress and malnutrition, which would kill 250,000 more people annually around the world from 2030 to 2050. A new report in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that number is a conservative estimate.

Dr. Caren Solomon is an associate professor at Harvard Medical School, physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and deputy editor at New England Journal of Medicine. In an editorial Solomon co-authored to accompany the article, she argued that medical professionals have a special responsibility to try to safeguard against these deaths -- that's what we discuss today on "Take Care."

Stephen Drake/Flickr

In January, British medical journal The Lancet published a treatise that argued consumers, business leaders and policymakers must focus their efforts on tackling obesity, climate change and hunger together to be able to solve all three effectively.

Marlene Schwartz, director for the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity and professor at the University of Connecticut, joined us on "Take Care" to discuss. She said this is a new approach that can go a long way in tackling three issues long thought best to handle separately.

Julian Osley/Geograph

Climate change can take a toll on mental health, but there are ways to alleviate such effects and promote real change, one expert argues on "Take Care" this week.

Dr. Lise Van Susteren is a general and forensic psychiatrist and co-founder of the Climate Psychiatry Alliance. She also co-authored the report “The Psychological Effects of Climate Warming on the U.S.: Why the U.S. Mental Health System is Not Prepared” in 2011.

How climate change affects public health

Apr 13, 2019
AgriLife Today/Flickr

There are plenty of news stories about how climate change is affecting the environment, but it is only recently we are discovering the long-term outcomes of climate change on our health. Dr. Jay Lemery, associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, said climate change has adverse, complex effects on our health.

Lemery discussed his findings about the public health effects of global warming in “Enviromedics: The Impact of Climate Change on Human Health,” which he co-authored with Paul Auerbach. Lemery joined us on "Take Care," and said one of the main results of climate change is prolonged heat waves.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO Public Media

One of the ways climate change can affect our health is through the spread of harmful algal blooms in lakes where people swim and get their drinking water. The blooms can cause adverse health effects and have been occurring more frequently in recent years.

Climate change and our health

Apr 11, 2019
United Nations Photo

"Take Care" returns with a broadcast examining climate change and it's impact on our health. Global warming is changing our planet -- the temperature, our seasons, agriculture and more -- but what kind of effect does climate change have on our health? In this episode, we ask how climate change is influencing our physical and mental health.

Matt Ryan / New York Now (file photo)

The New York State Senate began a series of hearings on climate change Tuesday. Democrats who lead the chamber back a measure to eliminate all greenhouse gas emissions in New York by 2050, but that may come into conflict with a program being pushed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Melissa DeRosa / Gov. Cuomo's office

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is again wading into national issues this week. He’s had a press conference against the latest attempt in the U.S. Senate to repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. And he met with the governors of California and Washington to discuss steps to slow climate change.

In both cases, the governor said he’s addressing the matters because the actions — or, in the case of climate change, inactions — in Washington have a harmful impact on New York.

File Photo
New York Now / WMHT

The former EPA regional administrator under President Barack Obama said scientists who leaked the report about further evidence of climate change to The New York Times should be commended as “whistleblowers.”

Decaseconds / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has signed an executive order committing the state to meet the Paris climate accord standards, calling President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from the agreement “reckless” and “irresponsible.”

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Some lawmakers are pressing the state’s comptroller to divest the state’s pension fund from the fossil fuel industry. But Comptroller Tom DiNapoli said he believes he can be more effective in changing the companies’ behavior by acting from the inside.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Central New Yorkers rang in President Donald Trump’s 100th day in office in starkly different rallies in Syracuse this weekend. The two events Saturday were only a few miles away, but the political distance between the two groups seemed much farther.

At one event, hundreds marched to Syracuse’s Inner Harbor in coordination with climate change demonstrations across the country. They carried signs blasting the Trump administration for rolling back environmental regulations. Jacqueline King’s sign called for his impeachment.

Thirsty Planet

Apr 12, 2017
Stephen Smith / APM Reports

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel.

Courtesy: The Nature Conservancy

The Nature Conservancy is hoping to create a climate resilient forest on the Tug Hill Plateau.

The Tug Hill Plateau is the third-largest forest landscape in the New York state -- a critical link between the Adirondacks and the Allegheny and Appalachian mountains. Its headwaters pour clean water into Lake Ontario, and the area is home to a variety of wildlife, ranging from black bears to forest birds.

Matt Ryan / New York Now

Environmental groups are pushing Gov. Andrew Cuomo to codify into law some of the steps he’s taken to protect the environment and cut down on pollution related to climate change. At a budget hearing Monday, lawmakers were focused on a more immediate concern — clean drinking water.

Legislative budget hearings were interrupted once again, this time by anti-climate change activists shouting that they want “climate justice in the budget.”

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Some central New Yorkers are urging Congress to reject some of President-elect Donald Trump’s cabinet picks. They brought their message to the Federal Building during a protest in Syracuse Monday. 

Syracuse physician Marianna Kaufman is part of the newly formed CNY Solidarity coalition. She says that group is particularly against four Trump nominees they call climate change deniers.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Environmentalists are bringing a giant yellow oil barrel across New York State to bring attention to Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s fight to extract internal research from Exxon Mobile about climate change.

Bret Jaspers / WSKG News

Jobs were a major topic at a candidate forum at SUNY Broome for the 22nd Congressional District Thursday. But climate change came up as well, and there were definite differences in how the three candidates talked about it. 

Democrat Kim Myers advocated for government incentives to develop new technologies.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

New York Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) said his position on climate change is "evolving." The Republican representative recently signed onto a resolution that acknowledges a human role in causing climate change related to erratic and damaging weather patterns. That's a reversal from his 2014 campaign when he said it was unclear if human activities had any influence.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

While most central and northern New York crops are being planted right now, there’s one that’s being harvested. SUNY ESF researchers are harvesting willow, as part of a project that continues to find the best way to use the woody plant as an alternative energy source.

When most people hear the word willow, an image of a weeping willow tree comes to mind. But that’s not what SUNY ESF researchers are working on in the Willow Project, a program that’s developing a biomass energy source.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Central New York is preparing to have more electric vehicles on the roads in the near future.

Chevrolet is promising that it will deliver an affordable electric vehicle with a 200-mile range to showrooms by the end of this year. Other electric vehicle producers are expected to follow suit. So with the potential of more of these vehicles hitting the highway, Central New York’s Regional Planning and Development Board is getting ready.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Planting season is getting underway in central New York. And for farmers it means another year when the changing climate can make or break a growing season. But farmers aren’t sitting still when it comes to dealing with the more severe weather that comes along with a warming climate.

Lewis County officials embrace solar energy

Dec 2, 2015
U.S. Department of Agricuture / Flickr, Creative Commons

Lewis County is now looking to solar to help save on energy costs. County officials expect the new solar project to generate enough power to supply half the energy needed to run the municipal hospital and county offices.

Lewis County plans to fill a nine- acre parcel of land behind the Public Safety Building in Lowville with enough solar panels to produce two-megawatts of energy. Chairman Mike Tabolt, head of the Lewis County Board of Legislators, is negotiating with Greenskies Renewable Energy to develop the solar array.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

As the fourth anniversary of the devastating storms Irene and Lee approaches, the Cuomo administration says it’s more ready than ever for hurricanes, floods, and other adverse weather events .

Since Gov. Andrew Cuomo took office in 2011, there’s been a succession of severe storms, including hurricanes Irene and Lee that brought massive flooding to upstate and Superstorm Sandy in 2012 that flooded beach front communities on Long Island and submerged portions of the New York City subway system in corrosive salt water.

EPA says clean power plan will protect public health

Aug 12, 2015
Kate O'Connell / WXXI File Photo

New carbon standards in the Clean Power Plan announced earlier this month by the Obama administration are also intended to improve your health. The goal of the new rules and regulations is to reduce the 7,500 deaths per year linked to particle pollution from power plants.

The Environmental Protection Agency calls climate change a threat to human health.Judith Enck, EPA administrator for the region that includes New York state, says the new standards will make the air easier to breathe for people with repertory illnesses, like the 25 million Americans who live with asthma.

Kate O'Connell / WXXI News

President Barack Obama’s plan for national standards to curb power plant emissions is based, in part, on a type of cap-and-trade program already existence in New York.  

Conor Bambrick, with the group Environmental Advocates, says he thinks the president's plan , billed by the White House as the “first-ever national standards” to curb carbon pollution from power plants has some of its roots in New York.

James Willamor / Flickr

This Sunday, June 7, on Public Radio Presents, join us for a story from Ithaca.

The climate is going haywire, and politicians are bickering over what to do about it, or whether to do anything at all. But that’s only part of the story. Around the country, communities are taking matters into their own hands, publicly pledging to shrink their carbon footprints, then setting out to make good on their promises. Leading, they hope, from below.

The Adaptors: An Earth Day special from BURN

Apr 13, 2015

Climate change is calling. "The Adaptors" are responding... Join us for this Earth Day special from "BURN: An energy journal" this week on Public Radio Presents.

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