diet

For centuries, it was seen as a useless organ, but the appendix is now believed to play a role in the body's immune system -- and many doctors and patients are thinking twice before having the organ removed.

Sometimes when the appendix becomes inflamed, surgery is still recommended. Surgeon Moustafa Hassan explains how that is accomplished and what to consider before the operation in this week’s “HealthLink on Air.”

National Cancer Institute/Wikimedia Commons

With seemingly a new fad diet coming out every week, a recent movement has turned to anti-dieting, focusing more on wellness rather than weight. The best approach, though, may be a middle ground individualized to what each person needs, according to a registered dietitian-nutritionist.

Samantha Cassetty is a contributing nutritionist for NBC News Better. In her article “Is the anti-diet movement leading us astray?”, she said there are a lot of good ideas to take away from the anti-diet movement, like the importance of feeling compassion and love toward oneself.

Extremes in health and wellness

Nov 9, 2018
Xenja Santarelli / Flickr

Health and wellness is a popular topic these days. It's not just exercising or eating well anymore. With increased interest comes some new ideas – and new research to back them up. Some of those ideas can seem a little extreme. That’s what we’re exploring this time on “Take Care,” tune in for more on health and wellness extremes.

You’ll hear discussions on new algorithms to help diagnose rare disease, the idea of “positive stress” and what it means for our longevity, why the anti-diet movement doesn’t have to be all or nothing, how one organization is literally going door to door to make a difference, and more.

Penguin Random House

Recent health trends have put a lot of emphasis on consuming healthy diets that are great for our body and overall wellness, but what's good for the body may not always be good for the brain, according to a neuroscientist, nutritionist and author.

Dr. Lisa Mosconi is associate director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medical College New York Presbyterian Hospital. Her book, “Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power,” discusses how one’s diet can significantly affect brain functionality.

the unnamed / Flickr

When we set out to put together this episode of "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show, we were told over and over again that there wasn't a lot known about the topic we wanted to explore -- the brain. The brain is infinitely complex. What we do know about the brain we've learned from neuroscientists, biologists and psychologists -- and they're continuing to make ground-breaking discoveries daily about how the organ works and what that means for our health and wellness. Needless to say, we took a stab at it anyway!

New research suggests that the key to weight loss is the quality of a diet, rather than the quantity of food eaten.

"HealthLink on Air" brings you a special show this week for World Cancer Day.

A century ago, people diagnosed with lung cancer had few options. Surgery meant cutting open the patient's chest and removing an entire lung.

While sometimes that type of procedure is still necessary today, surgeons are much more likely to operate through tiny incisions to remove just a lobe from the lung or a piece of a lobe.

A safe and happy holiday is within reach

Dec 9, 2017
Isabell Hubert / flickr

The much-anticipated holiday season is full of joy, but it’s also full of dashing through the snow to the mall with a cold to get some last-minute gifts. It’s seeing relatives you wished you could spend time with more often and some you wish you could write off altogether. And while setting up your Christmas light display makes the grandkids happy, it also means getting up on your very steep roof.

Like anything, the holiday season has pros and cons. In this holiday special, we’ll try to get you off on the right foot. Whether it’s staying healthy, keeping track of your finances in this busy spending time, or focusing on the positive when you’re hosting 20 relatives for dinner -- there are ways to start off 2018 relatively unscathed. First, we’ll focus on physical health.

Michael Stern / Flickr

Increased protein in your diet can help aid in weight loss and build muscle mass, and while most of us get plenty of protein each day, one group isn’t getting enough of it. A recent review challenging the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) says that elderly and critically ill patients aren't getting enough protein to combat muscle loss.

Dr. Stuart Phillips, a Professor at McMaster University, and director of the Physical Activity Centre of Excellence (PACE), joins us today to discuss his review in Frontiers in Nutrition challenging the RDA on protein intake guidelines (RDA is established by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences).

Protein-packed breakfasts without the eggs

Sep 30, 2017
WordShore / Flickr

Frequently referred to as the most important meal of the day, there can be no question that a well-balanced breakfast is an important health consideration. And another important consideration -- getting enough protein.

Eggs are one breakfast selection guaranteed to pack a protein punch, but are they the only way to start your day with protein? To find out, “Take Care” spoke with Johannah Sakimura, a registered dietician and nutritionist for the Atlantic Health System, with a master’s degree in nutrition from Columbia.

An Upstate scientist has found a way to identify when a person has a concussion and predict how long their recovery will take -- using a simple saliva test.

Getting protein on the go

Apr 29, 2017
Alyson Hurt / Flickr

Getting protein during a sit-down meal may not be hard, but getting more protein in snacks can be more difficult. Many protein-rich foods like meat are hard to consume when you’re on the go.

This week on "Take Care," nutritionist Joan Rogus discusses protein’s role in our diet and the various snacks that are packed with it, including some surprising ones. Rogus is a registered dietician in central New York who has her own private practice in Syracuse.

Should you avoid aspartame?

Mar 11, 2017
Steve Snodgrass / Flickr

The harmful effects sugar can have on the body has been given a lot of attention. Known for sabotaging diets and packing on extra calories, many people try to avoid sugar by seeking out artificial sweeteners as an alternative. But according to a new study by the Harvard Medical School, one common sugar substitute, aspartame, could be sabotaging your diet, too. And ironically enough, it is often used most in “diet” products (diet soda, for example).

To understand more about this study, this week on “Take Care” Dr. Richard Hodin, professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School, discusses the effects of aspartame on the body.

Al Case/Flickr

It’s common knowledge that eating sugar does no favors for a body. But is sugar having worse effects than just adding empty calories to our diets?

Award winning investigative science journalist and cofounder of the Nutrition Science Initiative Gary Taubes discusses the detrimental effects that excessive sugar consumption has on people, and how “excessive” may be actually a lot lower than you might think. Taubes is the author of the new book, "The Case Against Sugar."

Daniel Cukler / Flickr

While many agree that it’s good practice to eat vegetables regularly, what about going all-in and committing to a vegetarian diet? These days, leading health experts point to the diet’s many benefits, as long as you do your homework. Should you include eggs and dairy? How much protein is essential to good health? How do you eat a balanced and nutritious vegetarian diet?

This week on “Take Care,” advice on how to eat a healthy vegetarian diet from one of the nation’s top experts on nutrition, Dr. Donald Hensrud. Hensrud is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller “The Mayo Clinic Diet.” He’s also chair of the Division of Preventive, Occupations and Aerospace Medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program.

Spice up your health

Jan 13, 2017
Tony Mendez / Flickr

Many of us think of spices as just ingredients for cooking. But for centuries, some have believed in their medicinal powers. And science is proving some of that ancient lore to be correct. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Natasha MacAller, the author of the book "Spice Health Heroes: Unlock the Power of Spice for Flavor and Wellbeing," about the basics of spices and their health properties.

This week: living well, eating right

Dec 27, 2016

A person’s wellness depends not just on managing his or her diseases, but in getting into a routine that brings contentment and peace, says Dr. Kaushal Nanavati, a family practitioner and medical director of integrative therapy at Upstate Medical University.

He explains his “Core Four” concepts of wellness: nutrition, physical exercise, stress management and spiritual wellness -- which he outlines in a recent book.

Diet, disease, and detrimental fats

Dec 17, 2016

Just how much of a role does diet play in overall health? And what dietary advice is best to follow?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Walter Willett, chair of the Nutrition Department at the Harvard School of Public Health and the Fredrick John Stare Professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition, discusses what we've learned from nutrition studies over the years and how that information has helped shape dietary guidelines to improve human health.

This week: childhood illnesses, portion sizes, more

Nov 2, 2016

Colds and viruses get passed around by children, but families can get through such illnesses by following some simple practices and staying in touch with a doctor, says Dr. Jaclyn Sisskind, a pediatrician at Upstate University Hospital.

Pseph / Flickr

It’s a difficult fact to swallow -- Americans are heavier than ever. For a number of decades, we’ve been told that dietary fat was unhealthy and eating fat would make us gain weight. Fat equals fat, right? Our guest this week explains that the equation is not that simple. The tide is turning on fat.

Dr. Mark Hyman is a physician, a nine-time New York Times bestselling author, and director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine. His latest book is “Eat Fat, Get Thin,” and that’s what he believes -- we can add fats back into our diet (keeping in mind that not all fats are created equal) and stay healthy. Hyman is the founder and medical director of The UltraWellness Center, a medical editor at The Huffington Post, and has been a regular medical contributor to CBS This Morning and The Today Show.

This week: Emotional eating, 3-D mammography and more

Mar 11, 2016

Why does stress cause some people to lose their appetite and others to gorge?

Patrick Sweeney explores the complex relationships between emotion, genetics and eating patterns on this week's HealthLink on Air. He's a neurosciences doctoral candidate in Upstate’s College of Graduate Studies who recently published research showing that brain regions involved with emotion and stress are also involved in feeding behavior -- something not previously reported. He hopes future research might lead to drugs for individual circuits of the brain, rather than the entire brain.

Crystal Fieldhouse / Flickr

There are few things as intimate as food, according to this week’s guest. Food affects the quality of our day; we celebrate with food; we’re passionate about food -- for health and pleasure. And this fascination presents an opportunity for exploitation, says Dr. David Katz, who has been following the diet debate for years.

Blue Zones residents living longer, healthier lives

Jul 19, 2015
Ed Schipul / Flickr

Roughly one in 5,000 people in the United States lives to be 100 years old, yet there are concentrated places in the world where living to 100 is not unusual, and people manage to live this long without contracting any preventable diseases. These areas, called “Blue Zones,” are located in Ikaria, Greece; Okinawa, Japan; Ogliastra Region, Sardinia; Loma Linda, California; and Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to National Geographic Explorer Dan Buettner, who has traveled the globe to uncover the longevity secrets used in these Blue Zones, how these people are able to live for such a remarkably long time. Buettner recently released his latest book, “The Blue Zones Solution: Eating and Living Like the World’s Healthiest People.”

Hot dogs and hamburgers: the truth about the meat we buy

Jul 19, 2015
Chris H / Flickr

According to the National Sausage and Hot Dog Council, during peak hotdog season, Americans typically consume 7 billion hot dogs. But what exactly is in these hotdogs that people buy at the supermarket, and is it healthy for people to be eating so many of them?

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Kerri-Ann Jennings about what exactly is in the meat of the hot dogs and hamburgers that we eat. Jennings is a registered dietician and nutritionist, as well as former editor for Eating Well Magazine.

No yolks about it, eggs are healthy

May 31, 2015
UnknownNet Photography / Flickr

One day you hear they’re good for you and other days you hear they’re bad. The healthiness (or unhealthiness) of eggs have been debated for decades. Does the protein outweigh the cholesterol? What makes an egg good or bad and should we continue incorporating eggs into our diets?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Luc Djousse discusses the nutritional value of eggs. Djousse is director of research in the Division of Aging at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and is assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

The myths of detox diets

Apr 19, 2015
Marilyn M / Flickr

Can mixing cayenne pepper, lemon juice, syrup and water help flush out toxins from your body? Can detoxing help weight loss?

This week on “Take Care,” Susan Moores discusses the negative effects detox diets have on the body. Moores is a registered dietician and former national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

Have you ever wondered how to revamp your eating habits during cold and flu season to strengthen your immune system? There are five simple foods you can add to your diet to help you reach immune health and achieve nutritional balance.

This week on “Take Care,” Michelle Dudash discusses immune boosting foods. Dudash is a registered dietician, a Cordon Bleu-certified chef and the author of “Clean Eating for Busy Families: Get Meals on the Table in Minutes with Simple and Satisfying Whole-Foods Recipes You and Your Kids Will Love.”

sandstep / Flickr

Editor's note: On September 19, 2018, JAMA published retractions for six food research articles written by Brian Wansink. Earlier this year, the journal issued "expression of concern" notices and asked that Cornell University conduct an independent evaluation of the articles. The university has been "unable to provide assurances regarding the scientific validity of the six studies," according to the retraction notice. [more] Wansink has been removed from all teaching and research at the university and will retire at the end of the 2018-2019 academic year.

How we eat has a lot to do with our environment. However, there are tricks we can utilize to improve our overall quality of eating.

This week on “Take Care,” Brian Wansink talks about redesigning our lives and our eating habits. Wansink directs the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab and is the author of “Slim by Design: Mindless Eating Solutions for Everyday Life.”

How adjustments in diet can reduce inflammation

Feb 22, 2015
Wikimedia Commons

Inflammation can be a reaction to an injury or infection where the body reddens and swells. It’s sometimes painful and can also be a sign that the body is ready to begin the healing process. But, chronic inflammation is a cause for concern and even has ties to heart disease.

This week on “Take Care,” health expert Johannah Sakimura discusses foods that are high in anti-inflammatory compounds. Sakimura writes the Nutrition Sleuth column at Everyday Health. She has a master’s degree in nutrition from the Columbia University Institute of Human Nutrition.

Maintaining a healthy weight through the holidays

Dec 7, 2014
thepeachmartini / Flickr

It happens every year. The holiday season rolls around and suddenly you can’t eat enough. Some people argue that holiday food is the best food of the year, but what can we do to make sure we don’t end up ruining a year’s worth of diet and exercise?

This week on “Take Care,” registered dietician Ashley Koff suggests strategies to eat healthy and not gain too much weight during the holiday time. Koff is a contributing editor to Prevention magazine, the author of two books and on the faculty of the Continuum Center for Health and Healing at the Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City.

Pages