health

Christopher Porter / Flickr

We all grow with time. It’s easiest to see in children: they get physically bigger, hit milestones -- learn to crawl, walk and speak. And the same is true of adults. It might not be as obvious, but our interests and experiences evolve over time, as does our understanding of ourselves. This time on “Take Care,” how we help those around us grow and grow into ourselves.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO Public Media

One of the ways climate change can affect our health is through the spread of harmful algal blooms in lakes where people swim and get their drinking water. The blooms can cause adverse health effects and have been occurring more frequently in recent years.

Climate change and our health

Apr 11, 2019
United Nations Photo

"Take Care" returns with a broadcast examining climate change and it's impact on our health. Global warming is changing our planet -- the temperature, our seasons, agriculture and more -- but what kind of effect does climate change have on our health? In this episode, we ask how climate change is influencing our physical and mental health.

FINGER LAKES PERFORMING PROVIDER SYSTEM

The number of people without health insurance in Steuben County has been cut in half since 2014. That should mean more people have access to the health care system. But that’s not always the case, according to Erin Bankey, who manages funds from a state program aimed at reducing hospital visits in the Finger Lakes.

"The story starts there, with trying to get people insurance, but then we found even people who have insurance don’t necessarily have the relationship with a primary care provider, or transportation, or healthy food,” Bankey said.

Is health education in America comprehensive?

Dec 22, 2018
Bill Stafford/NASA

In many states across the U.S., health education is taught in middle school or high school for a single semester, which is indicative of the lack of quality health education in classrooms, according to a health education professor at The University of Alabama.

Dr. David Birch, past president of the Society for Public Health Education, said health education is not taught the way it should be. He said there are many reasons, the first being that the lessons are not nearly comprehensive enough. We discuss more this week on "Take Care."

What is health?

Dec 19, 2018
Denise Mattox / Flickr

"Take Care" has always covered a wide range of topics -- addiction, Alzheimer's disease, cancer, winter health hazards, and even mold. As we wrap up the year, we take a step back. Instead of exploring one particular facet of health and wellness, we settle on one broad question for this show: What is health?

Aging today

Nov 29, 2018
Vanilla Ice Cream / Flickr

Aging is inevitable. For many of us, reaching our later years means some more aches and pains -- but hey, retirement isn't that bad! Age related diseases, though -- like dementia and Alzheimer's -- can throw a wrench in retirement plans by putting a strain on loved ones and families as they navigate the new norm. But with the latest advances in technology, maybe we can stave off the effects of some of these diseases or live healthier altogether. This time on "Take Care," we explore what it means to age today.

lisaclarke / Flickr

For today's latest in health segment, we look at solutions for two different kinds of patients -- one for those with genetic diseases and another for healthy people looking to stay that way.

First, we start with a new algorithm that could improve the diagnosis of rare diseases. Second, we look at a New York City lab that educates patients on making healthy lifestyle changes.

Yuxuan Wang

A growing trend in high-stress, demanding jobs is the “positive stress movement,” when people expose themselves to extreme temperatures, diets and exercise as a way to improve longevity. At Palo Alto Investors, though, the focus is on a far less radical approach to helping us perform better for longer.

Dr. Joon Yun is a physician and the president and managing partner of Palo Alto Investors, LLC. He also created and sponsored the Palo Alto Longevity Prize, launched in 2014, which provides a $1 million prize to anyone that cracks the code on stopping the aging process.

Extremes in health and wellness

Nov 9, 2018
Xenja Santarelli / Flickr

Health and wellness is a popular topic these days. It's not just exercising or eating well anymore. With increased interest comes some new ideas – and new research to back them up. Some of those ideas can seem a little extreme. That’s what we’re exploring this time on “Take Care,” tune in for more on health and wellness extremes.

You’ll hear discussions on new algorithms to help diagnose rare disease, the idea of “positive stress” and what it means for our longevity, why the anti-diet movement doesn’t have to be all or nothing, how one organization is literally going door to door to make a difference, and more.

Rob Bertholf / Flickr

Decades ago, people got their health information from their doctors. Today, information is much more available (thanks, internet). So much so that we're bombarded by it: lose weight forever with this one simple trick; here's the cleanse that will cure your bloat; don't lie awake in bed at night, take this supplement, cure insomnia. Many of these tips, tricks, cures and secrets are misleading and inaccurate, spread by celebrities and laypeople alike.

Timothy Caulfield has spent most of his career trying to find out if there's any evidence behind these wellness trends. He joins us on "Take Care" to dispel some myths and get to the root of the problem. Caulfield is a researcher, author and professor of health law and science policy at the University of Alberta. He's host of the show "A User's Guide to Cheating Death," which is available on Netflix.

Federica Testani / Flickr

Suicide numbers are up, according to the latest report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). When the CDC study came out earlier this year, it gained national attention amid some high-profile suicides and struggles with mental illness. With rates of suicide increasing in nearly every state in the U.S. between 1999 and 2016, many were left asking why?
 

Registered dietitian nutritionist Maureen Franklin discusses a diet that is recommended by the US Department of Agriculture and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute as an ideal eating plan for all Americans. It's called the DASH Diet, which stands for "Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension."

"Take Care" returns this weekend with our first show of 2018. We'll be exploring the theme of giving from a health and wellness perspective this hour with a handful of very engaging guests.

For the past six years, the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York has supported health and wellness programming on WRVO. While the vehicle has changed over the years, from community forums to weekly shows and hour-long specials, they’ve been committed to supporting our effects to bring listeners the latest in health and wellness news that affects your community and your life.

It's more a compulsion than an addiction, but many people have unhealthy attachments to their smartphones, says Upstate psychiatrist Christopher Lucas, MD.

A survey by the Pew Research Center found 46 percent of smartphone owners said they could not live without their phones. Lucas tells of another survey in which almost half of respondents said they'd rather break their arm than their cellphone.

How school nurses handle kids with diabetes

Nov 17, 2017
Sprogz / Flickr

The role of the school nurse has changed over the last few decades. Childhood obesity is on the rise and so are the number of kids with Type 2 diabetes. That means school nurses often have to administer insulin and other medications on a daily basis. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen talk with Margaret Pellizzari, a registered nurse and diabetes educator. Pellizzari is also program coordinator and assistant nurse manager in pediatric endocrinology at Cohen Children’s Medical Center on Long Island, New York.

Health officials will be trying to stop the potential spread of tuberculosis at a Syracuse city school. 

The Onondaga County Health Department was contacted this week about an individual at the PSLA High School at Fowler with an active case of TB, a bacterial illness that attacks the lungs.

Why don't more people know CPR?

Nov 3, 2017
Tommy Campbell Photography / American Heart Association 2017

If someone near you required had a cardiac event and needed CPR, would you know how to do it? If so, you would be part of just 20 percent of adults that are trained in CPR. If it's such an important lifesaving skill, why don't more people learn how it's done? This week on WRVO’s health and wellness show Take Care, hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen talk with Dr. Benjamin Abella, director of the Center for Resuscitation Science at the University of Pennsylvania.

Unlocking tips for a longer and healthier life

Oct 21, 2017
mmtzphoto / Flickr

One doctor doesn’t want you to be his patient. As a medical oncologist and palliative care specialist at the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Edward Creagan sees patients fighting for their life every day. Joining us to discuss his book "How Not to Be My Patient: A Physician's Secret for Staying Healthy and Surviving Any Diagnosis," Creagan also reveals some of his tips for living longer and healthier lives.

How happiness relates to health

Jul 22, 2017
Eric E. Castro / Flickr

Just a couple of decades ago, many of us would have been stunned to hear that companies were installing nap pods or allowing their employees to work from home to ensure they get ample family time. You may not have known about mindfulness or the benefits some find in meditation. And you likely would not have guessed that countries are paying as much attention to their citizens’ happiness as they are their economic standing.

Combating aging: the latest in medical technology

Jun 3, 2017
NEC-Medical -137 / Flickr

Getting older is an inevitable part of our lives, with age-related issues and conditions inspiring new advancements in technology to aid those affected. Whether it’s medication management, falling, or other problems facing aging adults, the latest medical technologies are offering new ways to combat those barriers.

To find out more about some of these new technologies, “Take Care” was joined by Dr. David Lindeman, director of the Center for Technology and Aging -- a research group in Oakland, California.

VERONICA VOLK / Great Lakes Today

On a tiny beach at Erie Basin Marina in Buffalo, N.Y., Nate Drag scans the sand and driftwood. He's part of the Alliance for the Great Lakes, and he helps organize beach clean ups.

"The closer you look, you can start seeing the plastic popping out," he says.

Last year, Drag says, hundreds of volunteers picked up thousands of pounds of trash. And lots of plastic bags.

"There you go," he said. "There's a garbage bag, and then there’s a shopping bag."

yaybiscuits123 / Flickr

Numerous studies have shown that starting the day with breakfast has a positive influence for students.

The federal government funds a program that allows income-eligible students to eat that first meal of the day at school, but less than one third of those who qualify for the program in New York state take advantage of it.

Aid in dying bill proposed in Albany

Jan 24, 2017
Jo Naylor / Flickr

A bill to legalize aid in dying has been re-submitted in the New York legislature. 

A similar bill passed the Assembly health committee last year. Organizers are hoping to go further this year, and get a vote in the full Assembly.

Any action on the legislation would come despite opposition from the Catholic Church and some people with disabilities, like Emily Papperman at Ithaca's Finger Lakes Independence Center. Papperman is worried that legalizing aid in dying will leave people with disabilities open to coercion from doctors and family members.

This week: treating eating disorders and more

Nov 30, 2016

This Sunday on "HealthLink on Air," radiation oncologist Dr. Michael Mix explains how stereotactic radiation can shorten treatment for some cancer patients. Plus, social worker Kathleen Deters-Hayes goes over treatment options for people with eating disorders.

Join us this Sunday, December 4 at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. for "HealthLink on Air" on WRVO.

Julia Botero / WRVO News

Earlier this fall, the Indian River Central School District in Jefferson County identified lead contamination in five sites around the district. Last month, state law went into effect requiring all schools test their drinking water for the toxic material. Lead is extremely harmful to young children, often leading to lower IQ’s, behavioral problems and even brain damage.

Loren Kerns / Flickr

Many Americans spend a good portion of the day sitting. Between a 40-hour work week and a commute, time spent sitting adds up, as do the associated health problems. Enter the standing desk. A popular option, the standing desk may be an effective way to combat risk factors associated with sitting.

But it's not just sitting that gets a bad rap. Standing for long periods of time can also take a toll on the body. Nurses, teachers and other professionals often complain of back pain and other stress associated with being on their feet day in and day out.

Julia Botero / WRVO News

North Country residents struggling with heroin and opioid addiction have a new treatment option. A medication-assisted heroin treatment center in Watertown is taking its first patients.

Until last week, Credo Community Center in Watertown offered recovering heroin addicts only abstinence treatment – the cold turkey approach to overcoming their substance abuse.

Jim Scordo, Credo’s executive director, says he found it didn’t work for some.

Little berries are big super food

Jul 16, 2016
Min Liu / Flickr

Whether you buy them fresh or frozen, pick them off the bush or grow them yourself, berries are one of the best foods to have in the house. They’re tasty and, nutrition-wise, pack a big punch for such a small food.

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