marijuana legalization

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As the debate on recreational and medicinal legalization of marijuana continues throughout the United States, an expert argues the discussion is much more complicated than the simple conclusions the opposing sides promote.

Jonathan Caulkins, a drug policy researcher and professor of operations research and public policy at Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, joins us on "Take Care" to talk more about the aspects of legalization. He's one of the authors of the book “Marijuana Legalization: What everyone needs to know.” Caulkins said some of the common arguments used both for and against marijuana legalization are oversimplified. 

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As New York’s medical marijuana program continues to expand, the program faces new challenges and more work to be done, especially with recreational legalization on the horizon, according to our next guest on "Take Care."

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People smoke marijuana. But it's not always experimenting high schoolers, and it's not always even for recreation. Medical marijuana is legal, in some way, in 33 states and the District of Columbia. And while eyes are opening to the benefits of medical marijuana, the debate continues. When it comes to recreational marijuana, many questions remain: How should it be related? Is it wise to open the flood gates to for-profit marijuana production and sales? We'll answer those questions and more this week on "Take Care."

Brett Levin / Flickr

After the failure to include legalized recreational marijuana in the New York state budget earlier this year, sponsors of the legislation say they are introducing a new bill that they hope stands a better chance at becoming law.

Sen. Liz Krueger, a Manhattan Democrat who is a longtime supporter of legalizing the drug, said the new bill incorporates some of the ideas the governor and Legislature came up with when they talked about the issue during budget talks.

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ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York state lawmakers who delivered a budget on time this past week are turning their attention to thorny debates over legalizing recreational marijuana and renewing New York City’s rent regulations.

Both issues are complicated and figuring out the details is likely to dominate the remainder of the legislative session, scheduled to end in late June.

Meanwhile, an odd exchange about a grocery store chain during the Senate’s recent budget debate is highlighting the perennial upstate-downstate divide.

Here’s a look at stories making news:

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Supporters of legalizing recreational marijuana plan to hold rallies each day at the State Capitol this week, urging Gov. Andrew Cuomo and state lawmakers to include the measure in the state budget.  

Kassandra Frederique with the Drug Policy Alliance said supporters worry that if the issue lingers until later in the session, its chances of passage will diminish.

“Kicking the can down the road more is not a good sign for us as community members,” Frederique said. “The urgency on what legalization can do for our communities is important.”

Brett Levin / Flickr

The chance to include the legalization of adult recreational marijuana in the state budget is fading, now that Gov. Andrew Cuomo seems to be backing away from the proposal.

Legislative leaders have already said it might be better to create a plan for adult use of recreational cannabis outside of the time pressures of the state budget, which is due at the end of the month. There are still many unanswered questions about who would be permitted to grow marijuana, distribute it and sell it.

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With three weeks to go until the April 1 budget deadline, Gov. Andrew Cuomo is drawing some lines in the sand on items that he said must be in the spending plan, like a permanent property tax cap.

But Cuomo said a proposal to legalize the adult use of marijuana likely will not be finished in time.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

It seems inevitable that New York state will legalize recreational marijuana sometime this year, now that the governor and leaders of the Legislature all agree that it should happen.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Friday he remains confident the Legislature can vote to legalize recreational marijuana as part of the state budget, which is due on April 1.

The optimistic comments came after Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, D-the Bronx, questioned whether lawmakers would have enough time to resolve thorny questions surrounding legalization while also working their way through a $175 billion budget.

Brett Levin / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday released details of his plan to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. Under the proposal, the drug would be taxed, regulated and sold to those 21 and over. It's expected to pass the state legislature this year, and drug prevention advocates are getting ready.

Kein Trease is an educator at the Prevention Network in Syracuse. He said when he goes to professional conferences, the talk is not about if marijuana becomes legal in New York, but when, and how to deal with that eventuality.

Brett Levin / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is set to release details of a plan to make recreational marijuana legal in New York state when he outlines his budget proposal later this month. Even the governor concedes, though, that there are many unanswered questions about how to proceed.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is beginning 2019 a little early. Cuomo, in a speech at the New York City Bar Association, outlined what he admits is an ambitious agenda for the first 100 days of his third term, which starts Jan. 1.  

Cuomo’s plans for the new year include codifying the abortion rights in the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade into state law. He also wants to protect the provisions of the federal Affordable Care Act in state statute, including protections for people with pre-existing conditions.