special programming

Neuroscientists and gerontologists see evidence that people become more vulnerable to financial exploitation as they age. Con artists, fraudsters, even family, friends, and caregivers take money from seniors and abuse their trust. According to researchers, the shame of these crimes prevents victims from reporting or talking about them, creating a crucial public policy issue.

"Marketplace Morning Report" host David Brancaccio presents immersive storytelling to explore the evidence for what doctors are calling "Age-Related Financial Vulnerability."

Tune in to the latest from "Can We Talk?" This week, we examine asking for help: why it’s so hard to admit when we need something from another person, and the surprising effects that sharing our vulnerability can have on our mental health.

The episode explores how shame and stigma can prevent us from asking for what we need, why we tend to underestimate the generosity of others, and how asking can make us feel seen in both welcome and uncomfortable ways. Finally, we address the complicated experience of wanting to help to someone who can’t or won’t ask for it. 

This hour-long program is about loneliness: what it is, why so many of us feel it, and the surprising toll loneliness takes on our physical and mental health. The health effects of chronic loneliness are akin to smoking 15 cigarettes every day -- it literally shortens our lives. Yet it can feel vulnerable to name it when we feel lonely.

"Here's the Thing" is a series of intimate and honest conversations hosted by Alec Baldwin. Alec talks with artists, policy makers and performers -- to hear their stories, what inspires their creations, what decisions changed their careers, and what relationships influenced their work.

This season of "Here's the Thing" includes six hour-long episodes, which you'll hear through the month of March and into April on WRVO. Tune in each Sunday night at 7 p.m. for eye-opening conversations.

Without gospel music there never would have been an Elvis Presley. There never would have been a Ray Charles, or a James Brown. From the mid-twentieth century on, gospel music not only thrived within a separate sphere as vital as the jazz, rock and rhythm and blues worlds; it also constantly intersected with the secular music industry, providing models that countless artists outside the church emulated.

More than 10 years ago, Lehman Brothers collapsed, and the world witnessed one of the worst financial crises in global history. In the United States, the stock market plummeted, unemployment soared, and the economy was thrown into a recession. And many other countries faced a similar fate. Has the world learned its lesson?

Some argue that the international framework for handling and responding to a future crisis is lacking. Beyond that, they argue, there is reduced market-making activity, less scope for reduced interest rates, and increased government spending and borrowing.

Liam James Doyle/NPR

The Senate is holding confirmation hearings this week for President Trump's pick to run the Justice Department. William Barr is the nominee to be the next Attorney General. Lawmakers are questioning his views on the Special Counsel's Russia investigation, whether a sitting president can be indicted, and other matters. Watch the proceedings live starting at 9:30 a.m.

Join us for a special broadcast this month in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. King grew up listening to and singing church songs, and saw gospel and folk music as natural tools to further the civil rights movement.

"A Beautiful Symphony of Brotherhood: A Musical Journey in the Life of Martin Luther King, Jr." interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work. The special also examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause.

Ben W / Flickr

Tonight at 9 p.m., President Donald Trump will address the nation from Washington. Trump is expected to talk about security and humanitarian aid on the US-Mexico border, his call for $5.7 billion in funding for a border wall, and the current partial government shutdown (now heading into its third week). His address will be followed immediately by a joint resonse from Democratic leaders, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer.

NPR News will have special coverage of Trump's remarks (his first from the Oval Office) along with analysis and reaction.

Join us for two consecutive weekends in January for the annual Best of the Best broadcast from the Third Coast Festival. Listen to winners of the 2018 Third Coast/Richard H. Driehaus Foundation documentary competition.

This year's program will feature producer interviews, highlights from this year’s unforgettable awards ceremony in Chicago, and excerpts from the following stories:

John Thompson vs. American Justice, produced by Andrew Marantz, Sarah Lustbader, and Katherine Wells and edited by David Krasnow for The New Yorker Radio Hour.

The Capitol Steps

Has it been a rough year? Did you buy stock in Sears? Or invest in Ivanka's clothing line? Did you take a job as a public relations spokesperson for Kanye West?

Then you may feel the need to laugh at 2018, and the Capitol Steps could not agree more! So tune in to the Capitol Steps' New Year's edition of "Politics Takes a Holiday," featuring songs from their latest album, Make America Grin Again.

Join us for narrative in words and music telling the story of the spontaneous truce arranged among soldiers along the Western Front, Christmas, 1914. Featuring over two dozen voices reading from letters and diaries of those who were there, with music also drawn from the period, including the songs they sang for each other and with each other.

"They ate, they sang, they played together. The cared for the wounded and buried the dead, with men of both armies working as one."

Tune in this Sunday, December 16 at 7 p.m. on WRVO.

Sergio Cabezas / Flickr

Join us for the Third Coast International Audio Festival's take on the holidays.

Stories include:

No Santa | by John Biewen for Scene on Radio (2015)

A father turns on a recorder while tucking in his 7-year-old, having no idea he’s about to capture a poignant growing-up moment in his son’s life.

Vince Guaraldi: A Charlie Brown Christmas | by Ben Manilla for Inside the National Recording Registry for Studio 360 (2012)

Cameron Pollack / NPR

On Wednesday morning, a funeral ceremony for former President George H. W. Bush will be held at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. Bush died late last Friday at age 94. A detailed schedule of the funeral and memorial services has been released.

As Democratic leaders and strategists gear up for the 2018 and 2020 elections, the party stands at a crossroads.

For progressive populists, the path forward is clear: Democrats must get back in touch with the party’s working-class roots by championing a specific set of policies, including Medicare for all, free public college tuition, a guaranteed federal jobs program, and housing as a human right. They say this strategy is key to winning back disillusioned working-class voters and to regaining power in Washington and beyond.

This hour stories that dive below the surface to help us understand issues of race, the environment and immigration. Join us this Sunday, October 28 at 7 p.m. for more.

How Race Was Made (Seeing White, Part 2) [excerpt]

by John Biewen (Scene on Radio , 2017)

New York State Fair

This year, at the Great New York State Fair, everyday New Yorkers told their own compelling true tales. We're sharing highlights of those stories this weekend as part of "Public Radio Presents."

Intelligence Squared U.S.

For the United States, tensions are rising with both allies and adversaries. Rogue states are racing to master new technologies and create weapons of mass destruction. And faith in international institutions is seemingly deteriorating. What does this all mean for U.S. national security?

Staged in the "Intelligence Squared U.S." "unresolved" format, five esteemed foreign policy thought leaders will argue for or against a number of motions revolving around some of America’s most pressing national security issues, including:

APM Reports

For generations, educators have fought about how kids learn to read and what that means about how they should be taught. Now, there is definitive evidence from neuroscience on how the brain learns to read and it suggests very different approaches to reading instruction than those that are commonly found in schools.

This APM Reports documentary explores why the reading science is not making its way into American classrooms – or teacher preparation programs – and what can be done about it.

Tune in on Sunday, September 23 at 7 p.m. on WRVO.

APM Reports

Apprenticeships are having a moment. Supporters on both the right and the left say the “earn while you learn” approach can help create a more skilled workforce, provide a path to solid, middle-class careers, and serve as a needed corrective to the “college for all” push that has left some students with piles of debt and no obvious career.

In this APM Reports documentary, we ask: How can apprenticeships expand to include careers beyond the traditional trades and reach new populations searching for a foothold in the middle class?

APM Reports

Mario Martinez and Katy Sorto were the first in their families to go to college. They started at community college in 2008 hoping to earn degrees, but the odds were against them. Both are from low-income families, they ended up in remedial classes, and they knew almost no one who had been to college. This APM Reports documentary tells their remarkable stories 10 years later and provides a rare window on the personal experience of trying to move up through education.

Join us Sunday, September 9 at 7 p.m. on WRVO.

Starting Tuesday morning, Senate confirmation hearings begin for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. The 53-year-old Federal Judge is President Trump’s pick to fill the spot left vacant by Justice Anthony Kennedy who retired in July. Democrats and Republicans are sharply divided over his nomination and the hearings will be a major political focal point in the months leading up to the midterm elections.

APM Reports

As part of a series on education from APM Reports, we're airing documentaries for the first four weeks in September on Public Radio Presents. For the first in the series, we ask if colleges help Americans move up into a higher socioeconomic class.

By connecting people across the world for free, platforms like Twitter and Facebook set the stage for a promising digital revolution, providing tools that helped foster global friendships, break down long-standing barriers that kept people and ideas from being heard, and served as the ultimate democratizing force for information.

#G7Charlevoix / Flickr

President Trump is holding a news conference at the White House with Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte. Conte has been in the office for a few months. His approach to government in Italy has been compared to that of Donald Trump in the United States. Italy has recently hardened its approach to immigration, for instance, and challenged European Union partners. Trump, for his part, has expressed support for Conte, at one point tweeting that "the people of Italy got it right!"

Watch live: The news conference will begin at approximately 2 p.m.

NATO North Atlantic Treaty Organization / Flickr

After weeks of headlines dominated by White House actions on the international stage, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will face questions from lawmakers Wednesday afternoon about how the Trump administration is managing foreign policy.

Live streaming video is expected to start at 3 p.m. this afternoon (below).

APM Reports returns with a three-part series in July and August. Join us starting Sunday, July 29 for "Order 9066: Japanese American Incarceration in WWII."

On February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, just months after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Some 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry were forced from their homes on the West Coast and sent to one of ten "relocation" camps, where they were imprisoned behind barbed wire for the length of the war. Two-thirds of them were American citizens.

President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin sat down for a summit today in in Helsinki, Finland. This is the first stand-alone summit between the two leaders, and comes just days after an American grand jury indicted 12 Russian intelligence officers on charges related to Russia's interference in the 2016 election.

Is Bitcoin here to stay, or is it a bubble waiting to pop? Less than a decade old, Bitcoin is worth billions. The cryptocurrency promises to revolutionize global finance by placing control of currency in the hands of users, not nations, and make financial exchanges more transparent, efficient, and democratic. And it seems to be taking hold: Earlier this year both the Cboe and CME debuted Bitcoin futures. But is Bitcoin really a safe bet?

Anthems can fuel patriotism, unite fans at baseball games, rally the troops or animate political movements.

For the next year, we'll unpack the elements of an anthem and ask what a song says about our diverse American communities as well as our collective soul.

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