Station Announcement

Announcements about scheduled outages, events, changes in signals or last minute program changes.

Brett Levin / Flickr

People smoke marijuana. But it's not always experimenting high schoolers, and it's not always even for recreation. Medical marijuana is legal, in some way, in 33 states and the District of Columbia. And while eyes are opening to the benefits of medical marijuana, the debate continues. When it comes to recreational marijuana, many questions remain: How should it be related? Is it wise to open the flood gates to for-profit marijuana production and sales? We'll answer those questions and more this week on "Take Care."

Bluff and bluster, words and whimsy come to Syracuse and Utica this November with special events from WRVO and “Says You!”

To mark WRVO’s 50th anniversary, the radio quiz show returns to the area for live show tapings. “Says You!” is public radio’s quintessential quiz show. It’s spirited and civil, brainy and boisterous, and peppered with musical interludes. You could be part of the live audience, laughing along with panelists on stage.

Stephen Voss / NPR

WRVO is bringing another well-known NPR personality to the central New York area this fall. Rachel Martin, host of “Morning Edition,” is visiting Syracuse in September for an evening with listeners and members of the station. She’ll share her experience as host of the most-listened-to news radio program in the country and as National Security Correspondent for NPR.

Neuroscientists and gerontologists see evidence that people become more vulnerable to financial exploitation as they age. Con artists, fraudsters, even family, friends, and caregivers take money from seniors and abuse their trust. According to researchers, the shame of these crimes prevents victims from reporting or talking about them, creating a crucial public policy issue.

"Marketplace Morning Report" host David Brancaccio presents immersive storytelling to explore the evidence for what doctors are calling "Age-Related Financial Vulnerability."

The Research Foundation for SUNY invites applications for a WRVO Digital Coordinator. While this position is located on the campus of SUNY Oswego, this is not a New York State position.

Posting Date: May 15, 2019

Review Date: Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled.

“Tuned to Yesterday: At the Movies” returns this June featuring the 1944 film, “Murder, My Sweet” at the Auburn Public Theater. Join us on Thursday, June 13 at 7 p.m. for a pre-movie presentation, a screening of the film and a reception.

Tune in to the latest from "Can We Talk?" This week, we examine asking for help: why it’s so hard to admit when we need something from another person, and the surprising effects that sharing our vulnerability can have on our mental health.

The episode explores how shame and stigma can prevent us from asking for what we need, why we tend to underestimate the generosity of others, and how asking can make us feel seen in both welcome and uncomfortable ways. Finally, we address the complicated experience of wanting to help to someone who can’t or won’t ask for it. 

Ben Terrett / Flickr

Creating great public radio requires time, effort and money. As we celebrate our first 50 years, please consider making an additional -- or first-time --$50 gift to WRVO.

Everyone at WRVO is thankful for the thousands of listeners who make voluntary contributions to keep this public service strong, but we came up a little short in our recent spring fundraiser. If we missed you during the drive, donate now, during the month of May. If we're able to raise the money we need now, we won't have to interrupt programming later.

Morning Edition / NPR

The historic theme you hear on "Morning Edition" each and every day debuted in 1979. The original BJ Leiderman composition and subsequent arrangements by musician Jim Pugh have been heard for decades. Beginning on May 6, listeners will hear a new theme -- one that will be fresh and modern, while also referencing the show’s historic music and honoring its legacy.

Summer Destinations: 1000 Islands

May 1, 2019

Enjoy many destinations perfect for the summer months in the Thousand Islands, including:

Alexandria Bay Chamber Events

Summer Destinations: Finger Lakes

May 1, 2019

There are plenty of great destinations to visit this summer in the Finger Lakes, including:

Auburn Public Theater

Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

Attorney General William Barr is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee to answer questions about special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. Watch the proceedings in the Republican-led committee live, below:

[Note: Testimony is expected to begin around 10:30 a.m. If it is after 10:30 a.m. and the video below does not display, please refresh your page.]

Summer Destinations: Adirondacks

May 1, 2019

There are many great destinations for summer fun in the Adirondacks, including:

Adirondack Experience

Summer Destinations: Central New York

May 1, 2019

There are many destinations perfect for a summer getaway in central New York, including:

Arney's Marina

Arney's Marina in the village of Sodus Bay. Founded 68 years ago, still owned and operated by the Arney family with customer service its priority. A Honda Outboard Premier Dealer backed by factory certified service personnel.

Bayview Wellness Center and Spa

This hour-long program is about loneliness: what it is, why so many of us feel it, and the surprising toll loneliness takes on our physical and mental health. The health effects of chronic loneliness are akin to smoking 15 cigarettes every day -- it literally shortens our lives. Yet it can feel vulnerable to name it when we feel lonely.

Christopher Porter / Flickr

We all grow with time. It’s easiest to see in children: they get physically bigger, hit milestones -- learn to crawl, walk and speak. And the same is true of adults. It might not be as obvious, but our interests and experiences evolve over time, as does our understanding of ourselves. This time on “Take Care,” how we help those around us grow and grow into ourselves.

Climate change and our health

Apr 11, 2019
United Nations Photo

"Take Care" returns with a broadcast examining climate change and it's impact on our health. Global warming is changing our planet -- the temperature, our seasons, agriculture and more -- but what kind of effect does climate change have on our health? In this episode, we ask how climate change is influencing our physical and mental health.

We're welcoming members, listeners and SUNY Oswego alumni to the station this June to say thank you for your support over the past 50 years. Come to enjoy light refreshments, tours and to mingle with staff, friends and alumni of WRVO on Saturday, June 8 from 2 - 5 p.m.

Ryan Zalduondo / WRVO

As the 25th anniversary of Heidi Allen's kidnapping approaches on April 3, WRVO is bringing you a special series on the story that has transfixed residents of Central and Northern New York for decades. Your host is Ryan Zalduondo, a senior at SUNY Oswego. Here's more from Ryan:

I only learned about Heidi Allen's story about a year and a half ago, in December of 2017.

A friend and I were on our way up to Potsdam to cover one of our school’s hockey games for the student newspaper, when we passed a Valero gas station pretty early in the trip.

"Here's the Thing" is a series of intimate and honest conversations hosted by Alec Baldwin. Alec talks with artists, policy makers and performers -- to hear their stories, what inspires their creations, what decisions changed their careers, and what relationships influenced their work.

This season of "Here's the Thing" includes six hour-long episodes, which you'll hear through the month of March and into April on WRVO. Tune in each Sunday night at 7 p.m. for eye-opening conversations.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Michael Cohen, President Trump's former lawyer, is testifying on Capitol Hill at 10 a.m. today. Cohen has been sentenced to three years in prison, to begin in May. He pleaded guilty last year to charges of campaign finance violations and other charges related to his work for Trump.

Anette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

Update: NPR has received notification that President Trump's remarks will occur closer to 10:30 this morning.

President Trump is speaking about border security at the White House. Congress passed a compromise spending measure Thursday to avert a government shutdown that includes some funding for the border barrier. But the White House says Trump will also sign an emergency declaration that will allow him to divert additional funds to build a wall as he has long promised.

Join us via the video stream below:

Without gospel music there never would have been an Elvis Presley. There never would have been a Ray Charles, or a James Brown. From the mid-twentieth century on, gospel music not only thrived within a separate sphere as vital as the jazz, rock and rhythm and blues worlds; it also constantly intersected with the secular music industry, providing models that countless artists outside the church emulated.

More than 10 years ago, Lehman Brothers collapsed, and the world witnessed one of the worst financial crises in global history. In the United States, the stock market plummeted, unemployment soared, and the economy was thrown into a recession. And many other countries faced a similar fate. Has the world learned its lesson?

Some argue that the international framework for handling and responding to a future crisis is lacking. Beyond that, they argue, there is reduced market-making activity, less scope for reduced interest rates, and increased government spending and borrowing.

Liam James Doyle/NPR

The Senate is holding confirmation hearings this week for President Trump's pick to run the Justice Department. William Barr is the nominee to be the next Attorney General. Lawmakers are questioning his views on the Special Counsel's Russia investigation, whether a sitting president can be indicted, and other matters. Watch the proceedings live starting at 9:30 a.m.

Join us for a special broadcast this month in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. King grew up listening to and singing church songs, and saw gospel and folk music as natural tools to further the civil rights movement.

"A Beautiful Symphony of Brotherhood: A Musical Journey in the Life of Martin Luther King, Jr." interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work. The special also examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause.

Ben W / Flickr

Tonight at 9 p.m., President Donald Trump will address the nation from Washington. Trump is expected to talk about security and humanitarian aid on the US-Mexico border, his call for $5.7 billion in funding for a border wall, and the current partial government shutdown (now heading into its third week). His address will be followed immediately by a joint resonse from Democratic leaders, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer.

NPR News will have special coverage of Trump's remarks (his first from the Oval Office) along with analysis and reaction.

WRVO Public Media

WRVO Public Media is celebrating a milestone in 2019. On January 6, 1969, WRVO aired its very first broadcast. Through the year, we'll be commemorating our 50th birthday, but we wanted to start with some history.

Liam James Doyle/NPR

The 116th Congress is beginning its first session today, and Democrats are now in control of the House of Representatives. Watch the first day of actions live, including the election for House Speaker, which Nancy Pelosi is expected to win, and debate on new House rules.

Join us for two consecutive weekends in January for the annual Best of the Best broadcast from the Third Coast Festival. Listen to winners of the 2018 Third Coast/Richard H. Driehaus Foundation documentary competition.

This year's program will feature producer interviews, highlights from this year’s unforgettable awards ceremony in Chicago, and excerpts from the following stories:

John Thompson vs. American Justice, produced by Andrew Marantz, Sarah Lustbader, and Katherine Wells and edited by David Krasnow for The New Yorker Radio Hour.

Pages