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Remarkable stories of LGBT+ rights, told by the people who were there. We hear stories of fighting homophobia in Uganda; how LGBT people in China sometimes arrange fake marriages to hide their sexuality; and meet the transgender American tennis player who fought for the right to compete in tournaments as a woman in the 1970s.

Listen Sunday, June 20 at 7 p.m. on WRVO, on-air and online.

American politician, diplomat, and geopolitical consultant Henry Kissinger's secret trip to China 50 years ago changed the Cold War. In July 1971, Kissinger, then US National Security Advisor, made a clandestine visit to the People’s Republic of China – then America’s sworn enemy. 

50 years on, the US and China are at a historic crossroads. Looking back, what can Presidents Biden and Xi learn from Kissinger’s trip?

Listen Sunday, June 13 at 7 p.m. on WRVO, on-air and online.

Intelligence Squared U.S.

Will you need a digital passport to prove you’ve been vaccinated the next time you try to board a flight or get into a concert? The idea is already being tested in Israel and governments around the world -- including the Biden administration -- are exploring what vaccine credentials might look like. For some, these digital tools are a golden ticket back to “normal” life. But for others, these tools raise dire concerns about privacy, civil rights, and equitable access.

State Archive of North Carolina / Flickr

In this one-hour Memorial Day special, NPR's Scott Simon hosts this new Oratorio in performance.

Summer Destinations: 1000 Islands

May 28, 2021
G Yancy / Flickr

Enjoy many destinations perfect for the summer months in the Thousand Islands, including:

Alexandria Bay Chamber Events

Summer Destinations: Finger Lakes

May 28, 2021
Visit Finger Lakes / Flickr

There are plenty of great destinations to visit this summer in the Finger Lakes, including:

Auburn Public Theater

Summer Destinations: Central New York

May 28, 2021
Russ Nelson / Flickr

There are many destinations perfect for a summer getaway in central New York, including:

Books End Bookshop 

Books End Bookshop is a one-stop shop for used, antiquarian, vintage, rare, and out-of-print books. Now in its 34th year, Books End is still a great place to browse and discover a hidden gem, or find that one book you always wanted. Their friendly and knowledgeable staff look forward to helping you.

Summer Destinations: Adirondacks

May 28, 2021
Kurt Wiegand / Unsplash

There are many great destinations for summer fun in the Adirondacks, including:

Howe Caverns

munshots / Unsplash

George Floyd has become a symbol, and a rallying cry. But what’s missing in our understanding is the man himself: a figure who was complicated, full of ambition, shaped by his family and his community and a century of forces around him.

Simonair Yoho / Kafi Kafi Co.

Amended, Episode 6: Walking in Two Worlds

When the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, a large number of Native American women still could not vote. The U.S. government did not recognize them as citizens. And if having U.S. citizenship required them to renounce tribal sovereignty, many Native women didn’t want it. But early-twentieth-century writer, composer, and activist Zitkála-Šá was determined to fight for both.

Julien Pouplard / Unsplash

Giving birth. Giving support. Being there. Being exhausted. To mark Mother’s Day, this episode of “The Pulse” reflects on some of the ways humans -- and other species -- juggle fierce love and the never-ending demands of childcare.

Listen Sunday, May 9 at 7 p.m. on WRVO, on-air and online.

NPR

NPR grew up alongside a post-Watergate journalism ethos that shaped the media industry for decades. In this special program, hosted by Audie Cornish and featuring other NPR journalists, we'll unpack that ethos: how it developed in the newsroom and changed over time, through today. Analytical, critical and forward-thinking, this program tells the story of NPR's history in the context of the growth of modern media. 

Listen Sunday, May 2 at 7 p.m. on WRVO, on-air and online.

Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

On the eve of 100 days in office, President Biden is giving an address to a joint session of Congress. Listen to WRVO Public Media for live on-air special coverage from NPR on Wednesday, April 28 beginning at 9 p.m. EST hosted by NPR's Michel Martin.

Live video of the President's address will be available as it begins at approximately 9 p.m. NPR reporters will also provide live fact-checking and annotations of both the President's address and the Republican response from Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina.

America Abroad Media

From his Black Baptist roots to his braggadocious banter, Cassius Clay joined the Nation of Islam and became Muhammad Ali. He was more than a  silver-tongued boxer; he was a champion for Black empowerment, and when he resisted the Vietnam draft -- an historic defender of religious freedom. Until the end of his life, Ali fought his own sacred struggle as he negotiated the release of hostages, journeyed with Parkinson’s disease, and worked across religious traditions to advance the dignity of all humanity. Ali shook up the world. And this means as much for us today as it did in the past. 

WRVO Public Media seeks a new morning news host to join our award-winning news team. The "Morning Edition" Host/News Reporter will serve as the local host of WRVO’s most important daypart, will write, prepare and deliver news and continuity during local portions of "Morning Edition," and will contribute news reports and features as required.

WAMU

In 2014, a second-grader named Relisha Rudd disappeared from a homeless shelter in Washington, D.C. where she had been living with her family. By the time the city formally declared Relisha “missing,” 18 days had passed since the last time she’d been seen at school or in the shelter. Relisha has never been found. "Through The Cracks" investigates gaps in our society and the people who fall through them, and in this program, host Jonquilyn Hill examines if Relisha’s disappearance was, as the city later claimed, unpreventable.

Simonair Yoho / Kafi Kafi Co.

Amended, Episode 4: Embers and Activism

On March 25, 1911, a fire swept through the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York City, claiming the lives of 146 workers. Most of the victims were young immigrant women from Eastern and Southern Europe. In the wake of the fire, a group of women labor activists fought to ensure that the tragedy led to concrete change. 

Simonair Yoho / Kafi Kafi Co.

Amended, Episode 5: The Submerged Half

In 1912, Mabel Lee, a teenaged immigrant from China, led a New York City suffrage parade on horseback. Ineligible for U.S. citizenship due to anti-Chinese immigration policy, Mabel nonetheless spoke out for American women’s political equality. She envisioned a world where all women had the right to vote—and she wanted white suffragists to pay attention to the discrimination and racism faced by Chinese American women. 

Simonair Yoho / Kafi Kafi Co.

Each week during the month of March, WRVO Public Media will air an episode each of "Amended" from Humanities New York in honor of Women's History Month. The series travels from the 1800s to the present day to show us a quest for women's full equality that has always been as diverse, complex and unfinished as the nation itself.

Episode 3: Of Rights and Wrongs

After the Civil War, many abolitionists and women’s rights activists saw an opportunity to team up and advance equality for all. 

Simonair Yoho / Kafi Kafi Co.

Each week during the month of March, WRVO Public Media will air an episode each of "Amended" from Humanities New York in honor of Women's History Month. The series travels from the 1800s to the present day to show us a quest for women's full equality that has always been as diverse, complex and unfinished as the nation itself.

Episode 2: Any Woman

Staying connected to accurate news coverage and vital information through the fast-changing events of this past year has been critically important for listeners in central and northern New York.

Simonair Yoho / Kafi Kafi Co.

Each week during the month of March, WRVO Public Media will air an episode each of "Amended" from Humanities New York in honor of Women's History Month. The series travels from the 1800s to the present day to show us a quest for women's full equality that has always been as diverse, complex and unfinished as the nation itself.

Episode 1: Myths and Sentiments

How do we tell the story of the (unfinished) struggle for women’s voting rights? Who gave us the dominant suffrage narrative? And who gets left out? 

Adam Schultz/White House / Flickr

President Biden is giving an address honoring the victims of the coronavirus pandemic as the country nears 500,000 deaths from COVID-19. Listen to his address on-air, at 6 p.m. EST, Monday, February 22 during "All Things Considered." Watch his remarks below as they begin.

[Note: If it is after 6:00 p.m. on Monday, February 22 and the video below does not display, please refresh the page.]

Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

The Senate Judiciary Committee holds a confirmation hearing for Merrick Garland, President Biden's nominee for attorney general this morning, Monday, February 22 at 9:30 a.m. EST. Garland is the former chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and has deep ties to the Justice Department, where he served as a prosecutor decades ago. 

[Note: If it is after 9:30 a.m. on Monday, February 22 and the video below does not display, please refresh the page.]

"Foneless" February is back! Support the in-depth news, intelligent discussion and entertaining programs you depend on every day.

PRX/Radio Smithsonian

"Black Radio: Telling It Like It Was" is the story of radio’s role in the 20th-century transformation of the African American community. First aired in 1996, the specials have been reformatted into six hours for 2021. Original host Lou Rawls guides us, with new narration from original producer Jacquie Gales Webb. WRVO will air this six-part series every Sunday in February. Episodes will air from 7 - 9:00 p.m. on February 7 and 14. This will preempt "Big Picture Science" for those weeks. The remaining episodes will air on February 21 and 28.

Former President Donald Trump is on trial for the second time in the Senate. This time, the House has impeached Trump for inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection

Live, on-air coverage from NPR, hosted by Audie Cornish and Scott Detrow begins at 10 a.m. on Saturday, February 13. Listen at home with your smart speaker. Just ask it to "play WRVO."

Watch live: Day 4 of Trump impeachment trial in the Senate

Feb 12, 2021

Former President Donald Trump is on trial for the second time in the Senate. This time, the House has impeached Trump for inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection. Friday, February 12, Trump's legal team will present their defense. Catch up with how the House impeachment managers wrapped up their case.

Former President Donald Trump is on trial for the second time in the Senate. This time, the House has impeached Trump for inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection. Thursday, February 11, the House impeachment managers will continue presenting their case starting at noon and lasting up to 8 hours. Catch up with takeaways from day 2 of the trial.

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