Looking back: A year of COVID-19 in central and northern New York

A WRVO News series looking back at the past year of the pandemic in the region.
Credit WRVO Public Media

In March 2020, life in central and northern New York changed in a matter of days. The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in schools and businesses closed, with thousands around the region either out of work or working from home. 

Through this spring, WRVO is taking a look back at how the pandemic affected different parts of the community, from colleges to the arts, from schools to healthcare. All stories in our series can be found below. 

Syracuse Catholic Diocese / YouTube Screenshot

This is one of a series of stories from WRVO on how the COVID-19 pandemic changed life in central and northern NY over the last year. Find all of the stories from our series here. 

Churches, temples and mosques have spent much of the last year empty, as the pandemic forced limits on gatherings. Despite that, the faithful have been able to maintain a sense of community.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO Public Media

This is one of a series of stories from WRVO on how the COVID-19 pandemic changed life in central and northern NY over the last year. Find all of the stories from our series here. 

Madison Ruffo / WRVO News

This is one of a series of stories from WRVO on how the COVID-19 pandemic changed life in central and northern NY over the last year. Find all of the stories from our series here. 

Richard Ferrucci, the owner of the Palisades Hotel restaurant in Rome, N.Y., remembers the moment he found out he’d have to shut his doors.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News (file photo)

This is one of a series of stories from WRVO on how the COVID-19 pandemic changed life in central and northern NY over the last year. Find all of the stories from our series here. 

The Community Foundation of Herkimer and Oneida Counties

As healthcare workers were dealing with the earthquake that was the Coronavirus, nonprofit organizations in central and northern New York were trying to address the aftershocks. 

"The addiction rates went up, a lot of homelessness as a result, we’ve seen an uptick in child abuse, domestic violence, gun violence," said Alicia Dicks, the president and CEO of the Community Foundation of Herkimer and Oneida Counties.

Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute Facebook

It’s been one year since music concerts, theatrical performances and museum exhibitions came to an abrupt halt, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Artists and arts organizations in central New York have endured financial loss and were forced to adapt to new circumstances. But a generous community has helped cushion the blow.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO Public Media

As the COVID-19 crisis started to form in central and northern New York one year ago, government and health officials told people to shelter in their homes and wait it out there. Healthcare workers, on the other hand, were sent out into the storm, unaware of what was to come or the toll it would take on them and their colleagues.

Payne Horning / WRVO News File Photo

About one year ago, the World Health Organization officially declared the coronavirus outbreak a global pandemic, and life around the world and in central New York came to a screeching halt.

March 9 was the first warm day in central New York last year and students at Syracuse University couldn’t resist the sunshine. Senior Josh Shub-Seltzer skipped class and spent the entire day on the lawn outside Psi Upsilon’s fraternity house and even watched the sunset from its steps at the day’s end.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

This is the first part of an occasional series looking back at the past year of the pandemic in the region. Watch for more stories through the month of March. 

  

It was this time last year that the coronavirus pandemic started affecting life in central and northern New York. Gov. Andrew Cuomo declared a state of emergency on March 7, 2020 because of the virus. At the time, there were 76 cases statewide. That number is now more than 1.6 million.