Take Care

Some Sundays at 7 p.m.

A conversation on health and wellness, Take Care draws upon the expertise of both regional guests and the country's leading authorities on medicine, technology, psychology and human behavior, health care, and public policy. Take Care explores a variety of topics that impact our lives and our choices in treating illness and enhancing wellness.

If you have a comment, question or suggestion for future broadcast - you can email the production team at takecare@wrvo.org any time.

Information on this broadcast is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. WRVO also provides a more detailed disclaimer.

WRVO allows republishing of Take Care web posts at no charge, with the following provisions:  a) no editing of scripts, graphics or audio is allowed;  b) "WRVO Public Media" shall be credited on the republished post; and c) notification of intent to republish a post is emailed to TakeCare@wrvo.org.

Support for Take Care comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

Intel Free Press/Flickr

Though obstacles still impede its application, telemedicine -- using technology to remotely connect physicians to patients -- is growing throughout the nation and the world, and a researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) believes it's a crucial tool to treating patients in the modern age.

Amar Gupta teaches a popular telemedicine course at MIT, and his work has led to several major technological advancements at MIT and other universities. Gupta said telemedicine has an important practical application that is not being fully utilized due to the nature of health care in the U.S. He shared his thoughts with us on "Take Care."

tr0tt3r / Flickr

This summer, Oklahoma’s Medicaid program was approved for a value-based purchasing program -- a first-in-the-nation drug pricing experiment that hopes to incentivize drug companies to stand behind their product.

Jackie Fortier reports on health policy for StateImpact Oklahoma, a collaboration of NPR member stations in Oklahoma that focuses on how government policy affects people’s lives. Fortier spoke to us this August on "Take Care," right before the new drug-pricing model began. She said though there are plenty of skeptics, the new program might do some good for the state and provide an example for other states to follow.

Kiran Foster/Flickr

Americans who suffer from a severe mental illness, including depression and bipolar disorder, have a life expectancy 15 to 30 years shorter than those without mental illnesses, according to a New York Times article published earlier this year.

Dr. Dhruv Khullar, an attending physician at New York - Presbyterian Hospital and a researcher at the Weill Cornell Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, wrote the article after caring for patients with mental illnesses and watching the effects mental struggles have on physical health.

Council of Accountable Physician Practices / Flickr

An opinion piece published in STAT, a health-centered media group, detailed the paradoxical struggle of physicians spending too much time reporting quality data to actually deliver quality medical care to their patients.

Dr. Jerry Penso, president and chief executive officer at AMGA (formerly the American Medical Group Association), wrote that though there are well-meaning intentions behind mandatory quality reporting, the ultimate result is detrimental both to physicians and their patients. We spoke to him this month for "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show.

JasonParis / Flickr

The Arc New York supports people with intellectual and developmental disabilities with programs, services and advocacy work. Their aim is inclusion. By providing guidance to family members and focusing on indepencence and comfort, they believe people with disabilities can have quality of life within their community.

This time on "Take Care," we spoke with Tania Seaburg, chief policy and operations officer for the organization. Our conversation centers on employment efforts, one of The Arc's key approaches to providing a more normal life for a portion of the population that is often at a disadvantage otherwise.

In My Father's Kitchen

Access to health care is important for individuals overall physical, social and mental health. But there are barriers for many Americans according to the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- including the high cost of care, inadequate insurance coverage (or no coverage at all), or lack of available services. As Ellen Abbott reports, there are attempts in many communities to remove these barriers.

Removing barriers to health

Aug 13, 2018
eltpics / Flickr

Health and wellness isn't a right for all people. For many of us, it's a privilege. Whether the issue is cost, transportation, resources or red tape -- many things can get in the way of living a long, health life. This time on "Take Care," we speak to people who are trying to remove these barriers.

Alzheimer’s disease currently afflicts 5.7 million Americans, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. That fact has led researchers in Massachusetts to discover non-invasive treatments for it and other neurodegenerative conditions.

Dr. Diane Chan is a neurologist helping to lead research at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research focuses on brain rhythms and how they can be studied and stimulated to counteract the effects of neurological diseases.

daisy.images / Flickr

For many years, American society has presented males and females as inherently different, including in the way they think, but a professor of neuroscience said though some differences exist between males and females on a biological level, their brains are largely the same.

Dr. Lise Eliot is a neuroscience professor at the Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. In her book, “Pink Brain, Blue Brain,” she explored sex differences and how those differences can grow into troublesome gaps.

Penguin Random House

Recent health trends have put a lot of emphasis on consuming healthy diets that are great for our body and overall wellness, but what's good for the body may not always be good for the brain, according to a neuroscientist, nutritionist and author.

Dr. Lisa Mosconi is associate director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medical College New York Presbyterian Hospital. Her book, “Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power,” discusses how one’s diet can significantly affect brain functionality.

Why you're not 'left-brained' or 'right-brained'

Jul 21, 2018
NIH Image Gallery / Flickr CC https://bit.ly/1jNlqZo

It's a well-established scientific fact that each hemisphere of the brain serves different functions in the body. That fact led to the popular belief that some people are more right-brained or left-brained in their personality. However, neuroscientific research proves that this theory is entirely false.

Dr. Jeff Anderson, assistant professor of radiology at the University of Utah’s School of Medicine, discussed his work with “Take Care,” which proves that though each side of the brain serves separate purposes, there is no connection between personality and which side of the brain is more active.

Human brain not built for modern society

Jul 21, 2018
John Medina

Though current American society often demands a monotonous daily routine for both adults and adolescents, a Seattle-based scientist and author argues workplaces and schools operate in a way counter to how the human brain functions best.

John Medina is a developmental molecular biologist and affiliate professor of bioengineering at the University of Washington School of Medicine. In his book, “Brain Rules,” he asserts that everybody’s brain is different, but none are perfectly suited for the life that modern American society presents.

the unnamed / Flickr

When we set out to put together this episode of "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show, we were told over and over again that there wasn't a lot known about the topic we wanted to explore -- the brain. The brain is infinitely complex. What we do know about the brain we've learned from neuroscientists, biologists and psychologists -- and they're continuing to make ground-breaking discoveries daily about how the organ works and what that means for our health and wellness. Needless to say, we took a stab at it anyway!

upupa4me / Flickr

Today in our latest in health segment: two recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) studies that reflect different trends in pediatric health.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

For teens facing depression, stress and other mental health problems, suicide can seem like the only way out. It's the third-leading cause of death for Americans between the ages of 10 and 24 according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. New York educators are now trying to alleviate the problems mental health is causing their students by addressing the issue head on.

Michelle Bartholomew Green lost her son Eric to suicide in 2013. The 18-year-old was a freshman at Alfred State College in western New York when he died.

Aaron_anderer / Flickr

Virtual reality, often pictured on the heads of avid gamers in the U.S., is finding a new purpose in an unexpected place: pediatric pain management.

Clinical psychologist Dr. Jeffrey Gold, director of the Pediatric Pain Management Clinic in the Department of Anesthesiology Critical Care Medicine at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, is the lead of a new study examining the effectiveness of virtual reality for kids undergoing painful procedures. He spoke with “Take Care” about the ways VR can be used to help children through typically painful, high-stress procedures.

TFrancis/flickr

The past two decades have seen a spike in the use of technology, so much so that the internet has become prevalent even in the classroom. A psychologist and internationally known expert on internet addiction argues that parents and teachers should be more careful about how much time children are spending in front of screens.

Dr. Kimberly Young, author and founder of the Center for Internet Addiction in 1995, said technology and internet addiction is increasing, especially in children, which can hinder young minds’ development.

Joe Green / Flickr

Adversity isn't something that's exclusive to our youngest generation, but when it occurs early in life, toxic stress can have lasting effects. Things like divorce, death, substance abuse or sexual assault can create both mental and physical issues down the road.

Pediatrician Dr. Darcy Lowell is founder and CEO of Child First. Child First is an organization that helps struggling families build strong, nurturing relationships with the goal of healing and protecting children from the impact of trauma and toxic stress. Lowell spoke to us on "Take Care" about why this type of stress is toxic, its lasting effects and how to help our children.

Indiana Stan / Flickr

With the demand for schools to focus more on academics and less on gym class, many districts in the U.S. have cut back students’ physical education times or eliminated them completely. However, an author and authority on the connection between brain activity and fitness said the two goals of fitness and academic success are not mutually exclusive.

Dr. John Ratey, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and internationally recognized expert on neuropsychiatry, spoke with “Take Care” about the importance of physical exercise on brain development, especially when it comes to adolescents.

atelier PRO / Flickr

On the next "Take Care," we're exploring the health of our children. Looking at the issue from mental and physical perspectives, we hear from a variety of experts on the topic. It should be no surprise that today's youngest generation is growing up differently than the generations before them.

Workman Publishing

Today in our latest in health segment: the ways in which we see ourselves.

Going gray is a natural part of most people's lives. There comes a time, often earlier in life than you'd think, where the pigment of your hair begins to change. So why all the fuss over covering it up? Some think that gray hair make them look older than they are. Some think that the color makes their complexion drab. But does it? We'll explore the idea of letting nature take its course when it comes to your hair.

Christine Hewitt

Yoga is depicted in pop culture as a physical exercise trend involving elaborate poses, performed with grace and beauty, mainly by upper-class white people in stretchy pants. That fact is very much on the radar of our next guest.

Jessamyn Stanley, a yoga teacher, author and advocate, argues that yoga is so much more than the manufactured images we see on Instagram. She shared her thoughts on the spiritual and mental effects of yoga and the positive emotional impact it has had on her life. These ideas are also explored in her book "Every Body Yoga: Let Go of Fear, Get on the Mat, Love Your Body."

Take a look in the mirror. Are you beauty sick?

May 20, 2018
Sam Sanford / Flickr

In a society where celebrities’ weights make the covers of tabloids and every health magazine sells a new way to look beautiful, one author is working to turn that focus inward.

Renee Engeln is a professor in the department of psychology at Northwestern University and author of “Beauty Sick: How the Cultural Obsession with Appearance Hurts Girls and Women.” She spoke with us on “Take Care” to discuss why women are especially affected by society’s focus on physical beauty.

orionpozo / Flickr

Recent trends have shown more people over the age of 65 are returning to work after retirement or only partially retiring rather than stopping work entirely. An economist at Harvard Medical School said this practice -- known as "unretirement" -- is becoming increasingly common, and not because of economic straits.

Nicole Maestas teaches health care policy at Harvard and conducted a study in 2010 about retirement trends. On this episode, we talked about the desire to continue working later in life.

Autopilot is death and other truths of midlife

May 19, 2018
TEDxAmoskeagMillyard/Flickr

Media has long depicted a person’s 40s and 50s as the time of the dreaded midlife crisis, when they begin questioning their purpose in life and inevitably get a faster car or a younger spouse. Our guest today says this could not be farther from the truth.

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is a journalist -- she was a longtime correspondent for NPR. Her book, “Life Reimagined: The Science, Art and Opportunity of Midlife,” is part research project part memoir. She spoke with us about the myth of the midlife crisis on "Take Care" and how you can seize the opportunities presented by midlife.

Accepting yourself: Aging and body image

May 17, 2018
Llima Orosa

This time on "Take Care," we take a look in the mirror (and, hopefully, a look inside ourselves). WRVO's health and wellness show is exploring body image, aging and acceptance this time around with a number of experts in these fields.

Cameron Harris/Flickr

The adage that a pear-shaped body is healthier than an apple-shaped body is prevalent in today’s health literature, but experts and research suggest that genes are to blame for the body types, and America’s cultural obsession with changing body shape is causing women in particular a lot of emotional and physical strain.

Cindy Shelbey/Flickr

It’s not easy to keep up with the latest in health and wellness. Each day, new studies, research and developments in health make it difficult to pick out the most important information for you.

We’ll be sharing a few of the latest developments in health at the end of each episode of “Take Care” this year. As the year goes on, we may even revisit some earlier news to see where things stand months later.

David Marshall / WXXI News

Opioids can have devastating consequences for the people who abuse them, affecting their health, safety and freedom -- but it doesn’t stop there.

Drug abuse can ruin the lives of people who never touch the substances themselves.

Temple University

As the opioid epidemic continues across the country, one graduate student is working on the collegiate level to provide a support system to treat opioid and other types of addiction on campus.

Bob Lamb is a graduate student in the Master of Public Health program at Temple University in Philadelphia and founder of the Temple Collegiate Recovery Program, a student group dedicated to fostering a community of peers in recovery. He spoke with us on “Take Care” about his personal and academic journey with addiction and how college programs can be an important part of recovery.

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