EMDR

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Post-traumatic stress disorder affects 7.8 million people at some point in their lives. Anyone who has suffered through an accident, war, natural disasters or sexual assault can develop post-traumatic stress.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Francine Shapiro talks about Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, or EMDR, a kind of therapy used to help victims of trauma. Shapiro is the originator and developer of EMDR therapy and is the executive director of the EMDR Institute in Watsonville, California.

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A growing body of medical evidence indicates that childhood trauma may be a major risk factor for poor health and quality of life in later years. But as life continues, instead of burying the past, many elders search for a way to get rid of the burdens associated with hurtful memories. This week, we interview an expert who says it’s not too late to resolve issues and achieve peace in your senior years.

Lisa Kendall joins us on “Take Care” to discuss options for resolving trauma before the end of life. Kendall is a licensed clinical social worker specializing in the areas of aging, elder care, trauma and adult survivors of childhood abuse. She speaks on these topics at a national level.

Helping victims of trauma

Jan 30, 2015

EMDR is a controversial kind of therapy meant to help patients get over different kinds of trauma. It stands for “Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing.” And while some doctors don't believe in it, others, and survivors of accidents, natural disasters and sexual assault, swear by this kind of treatment. And the Defense Department sanctions it to help veterans deal with post-traumatic stress disorder. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Francine Shapirom, who developed this therapy.