stress

atelier PRO / Flickr

On the next "Take Care," we're exploring the health of our children. Looking at the issue from mental and physical perspectives, we hear from a variety of experts on the topic. It should be no surprise that today's youngest generation is growing up differently than the generations before them.

A safe and happy holiday is within reach

Dec 9, 2017
Isabell Hubert / flickr

The much-anticipated holiday season is full of joy, but it’s also full of dashing through the snow to the mall with a cold to get some last-minute gifts. It’s seeing relatives you wished you could spend time with more often and some you wish you could write off altogether. And while setting up your Christmas light display makes the grandkids happy, it also means getting up on your very steep roof.

Like anything, the holiday season has pros and cons. In this holiday special, we’ll try to get you off on the right foot. Whether it’s staying healthy, keeping track of your finances in this busy spending time, or focusing on the positive when you’re hosting 20 relatives for dinner -- there are ways to start off 2018 relatively unscathed. First, we’ll focus on physical health.

Using hypnosis for more than just entertainment

Nov 5, 2016
Adam Dachis / Flickr

Hypnosis is often demonstrated in the entertainment world as someone dangling a stopwatch in front of another’s face telling them they’re “getting very sleepy,” and then when the person awakes, engaging in some bizarre behavior. But there’s more value to hypnosis than just entertainment.

Hypnosis can be used to medically treat disorders that involve the brain -- such as anxiety, stress, pain, and bad habits. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. David Spiegel of Stanford University explains the medical value of hypnosis. Spiegel is Willson Professor and Associate Chair of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of the Center on Stress and Health, and Medical Director of the Center for Integrative Medicine at Stanford School of Medicine.

According to Dr. Kaushal Nanavati, a person’s wellness depends not just on managing his or her diseases, but on getting into a routine that brings contentment and peace. Nanavati is a family practitioner and medical director of integrative therapy at Upstate Medical University.

This week: Emotional eating, 3-D mammography and more

Mar 11, 2016

Why does stress cause some people to lose their appetite and others to gorge?

Patrick Sweeney explores the complex relationships between emotion, genetics and eating patterns on this week's HealthLink on Air. He's a neurosciences doctoral candidate in Upstate’s College of Graduate Studies who recently published research showing that brain regions involved with emotion and stress are also involved in feeding behavior -- something not previously reported. He hopes future research might lead to drugs for individual circuits of the brain, rather than the entire brain.

Adam Lynch / Flickr

Caring for someone you love can have its rewards—one of them being peace of mind that they're in good hands. But providing long-term care can take its toll. In shouldering the emotional burdens of others, caregivers can feel drained and helpless to make a positive difference, and the result can be detrimental to their own health.

Compassion fatigue is the term used to define this, a term that’s not often heard. To talk about it this week on “Take Care” is Jane Pernotto Ehrman. Ehrman is a lead behavioral health specialist at Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Lifestyle Medicine in the Wellness Institute, where she oversees lifestyle wellness programs for chronic disease and general wellness.

How do we break our cultural obsession with weight? Author Harriet Brown says we must:

  1. Stop fat talking about ourselves,
  2. realize that being thin does not mean one is healthy, just as being fat does not mean one is unhealthy, and
  3. take our emphasis off of people's appearances.

Brown, a Syracuse University professor, speaks about what led her to write the book, "Body of Truth -- How Science, History and Culture Drive our Obsession with Weight and What We Can Do About It."

Thirteen of Clubs / Flickr

Avoiding stressful moments can be difficult living in today’s society. But new research about the impact of stress on your heart may make you want to try.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Peter Gianaros shares his research and advice on the risks stress has on the heart. Gianaros is an associate professor in the department of psychology at the University of Pittsburgh.