All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the more than four decades since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Kelly McEvers and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Michel Martin.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators.

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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Tomorrow marks 20 years since two gunmen at Columbine High School in Colorado killed 13 people. The incident is still relevant today. This week, the FBI says a woman infatuated with Columbine made credible threats, traveled to the area and bought a gun. From member station KUNC, Leigh Paterson reports that, for the last two decades, schools have taken steps to better protect and care for their students.

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Tomorrow marks 20 years since two gunmen at Columbine High School in Colorado killed 13 people. The incident is still relevant today. This week, the FBI says a woman infatuated with Columbine made credible threats, traveled to the area and bought a gun. From member station KUNC, Leigh Paterson reports that, for the last two decades, schools have taken steps to better protect and care for their students.

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Tomorrow marks 20 years since two gunmen at Columbine High School in Colorado killed 13 people. The incident is still relevant today. This week, the FBI says a woman infatuated with Columbine made credible threats, traveled to the area and bought a gun. From member station KUNC, Leigh Paterson reports that, for the last two decades, schools have taken steps to better protect and care for their students.

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Tomorrow marks 20 years since two gunmen at Columbine High School in Colorado killed 13 people. The incident is still relevant today. This week, the FBI says a woman infatuated with Columbine made credible threats, traveled to the area and bought a gun. From member station KUNC, Leigh Paterson reports that, for the last two decades, schools have taken steps to better protect and care for their students.

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Tomorrow marks 20 years since two gunmen at Columbine High School in Colorado killed 13 people. The incident is still relevant today. This week, the FBI says a woman infatuated with Columbine made credible threats, traveled to the area and bought a gun. From member station KUNC, Leigh Paterson reports that, for the last two decades, schools have taken steps to better protect and care for their students.

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Tomorrow marks 20 years since two gunmen at Columbine High School in Colorado killed 13 people. The incident is still relevant today. This week, the FBI says a woman infatuated with Columbine made credible threats, traveled to the area and bought a gun. From member station KUNC, Leigh Paterson reports that, for the last two decades, schools have taken steps to better protect and care for their students.

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We're going to turn now to Republican strategist Antonia Ferrier. She's a former senior communications adviser for Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. She's here with us in the studio. Welcome to the program.

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The Mueller report is out. For nearly two years, special counsel Robert Mueller and his team investigated questions about Russian interference in the 2016 election and whether President Trump obstructed that investigation.

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For reaction, we're going to hear from Democratic Congressman Adam Schiff. He's the chair of the House Intelligence Committee. He joins us on the line from California. Welcome, Congressman.

ADAM SCHIFF: Thank you. Great to be with you.

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Joining us now to talk through what the release of the report means for the president is NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Hey, Mara.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Hey, Ailsa.

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Apologies to Ohio. If you've never heard of the Columbus Blue Jackets, you're definitely not alone. On the flip side, the Tampa Bay Lightning wish they'd never heard of the Blue Jackets. The Lightning were by far the best team in the National Hockey League. In fact, there was a time - like, just over a week ago - that you could say they were one of the best teams ever. No team in NHL history had ever won more games in the regular season.

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Apologies to Ohio. If you've never heard of the Columbus Blue Jackets, you're definitely not alone. On the flip side, the Tampa Bay Lightning wish they'd never heard of the Blue Jackets. The Lightning were by far the best team in the National Hockey League. In fact, there was a time - like, just over a week ago - that you could say they were one of the best teams ever. No team in NHL history had ever won more games in the regular season.

Sometimes rare diseases can let scientists pioneer bold new ideas. That has been the case with a condition that strikes fewer than 100 babies a year in the United States. These infants are born without a functioning immune system.

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South Korea has enjoyed tremendous success exporting its modern culture, especially so-called K-pop music. But that industry is now facing its biggest crisis to date - a lurid scandal involving sexual violence and official corruption. As NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Seoul, the problems behind the scandal are deep-rooted.

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Volvo is a Chinese-owned Swedish company making cars in the U.S. When it decided to set up a plant in South Carolina to build cars to ship around the world, it was following a long tradition.

With its port, Charleston, S.C., has been a shipping hub for centuries. And the state has been home to international manufacturers for decades — BMW, Michelin and Bosch are among the many global firms with footholds there.

But before the plant opened last year, President Trump transformed America's approach to trade policy.

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South Korea has enjoyed tremendous success exporting its modern culture, especially so-called K-pop music. But that industry is now facing its biggest crisis to date - a lurid scandal involving sexual violence and official corruption. As NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Seoul, the problems behind the scandal are deep-rooted.

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At the Supreme Court today, the issue was bad language. Specifically, can the government refuse to grant trademark protection for brand names that include profanity? The immediate problem for the court was how to discuss the issue without using the actual words - how to discuss the F-word, for instance, without actually saying the F-word, which is a challenge that NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg faces in this report.

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