All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the more than four decades since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Kelly McEvers and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Michel Martin.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators.

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Ways to Connect

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

An outbreak of measles in Washington and Oregon has refocused attention on parents who choose not to vaccinate their kids, often known as anti-vaxxers. Public health advocates have struggled to change these parents' minds. One South Carolina woman has a different approach. She is reaching out to people before they even become parents. Alex Olgin of member station WFAE has the story.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

An outbreak of measles in Washington and Oregon has refocused attention on parents who choose not to vaccinate their kids, often known as anti-vaxxers. Public health advocates have struggled to change these parents' minds. One South Carolina woman has a different approach. She is reaching out to people before they even become parents. Alex Olgin of member station WFAE has the story.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

An outbreak of measles in Washington and Oregon has refocused attention on parents who choose not to vaccinate their kids, often known as anti-vaxxers. Public health advocates have struggled to change these parents' minds. One South Carolina woman has a different approach. She is reaching out to people before they even become parents. Alex Olgin of member station WFAE has the story.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

An outbreak of measles in Washington and Oregon has refocused attention on parents who choose not to vaccinate their kids, often known as anti-vaxxers. Public health advocates have struggled to change these parents' minds. One South Carolina woman has a different approach. She is reaching out to people before they even become parents. Alex Olgin of member station WFAE has the story.

Here's what's up with docs: They're doing great at the box office.

At last month's Sundance Film Festival, Knock Down the House broke the festival's documentary sales record: reportedly $10 million to Netflix. The film follows the 2018 campaigns of four female congressional candidates, including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

An outbreak of measles in Washington and Oregon has refocused attention on parents who choose not to vaccinate their kids, often known as anti-vaxxers. Public health advocates have struggled to change these parents' minds. One South Carolina woman has a different approach. She is reaching out to people before they even become parents. Alex Olgin of member station WFAE has the story.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

An outbreak of measles in Washington and Oregon has refocused attention on parents who choose not to vaccinate their kids, often known as anti-vaxxers. Public health advocates have struggled to change these parents' minds. One South Carolina woman has a different approach. She is reaching out to people before they even become parents. Alex Olgin of member station WFAE has the story.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Saxophonist and composer Greg Ward's latest album, Stomping Off From Greenwood, is a tribute to Chicago, the city where he came of age as a musician. It's also one of the year's first great jazz albums.

The first time I played Ward's new album, I was riveted by its sense of momentum and possibility, and the way its easy movement among styles made music feel like an open city.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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In a hypnotic opening dance between two would-be lovers, the new film Birds of Passage immediately establishes that it is in no way a typical Colombian drug-war epic.

After dance pioneer Alvin Ailey died in 1989, the future of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater was uncertain. It's difficult to keep a dance company profitable after its founder is long gone – many have tried and failed. But 30 years later, the group is thriving, and decided to celebrate its 60th anniversary and founder by commissioning a new work titled Lazarus.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For one of the nation's only historically black colleges for women, this week will be crucial for survival.

On Monday, Bennett College, in Greensboro, N.C., will argue its case for maintaining its accreditation at a hearing before the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, or SACS.

Copyright 2019 WLRN 91.3 FM. To see more, visit WLRN 91.3 FM.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Remembering Mars Rover, 'Opportunity'

Feb 16, 2019

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Nearly 20 years ago in March of 1999, there was a burning question on the minds of many filmgoers.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "THE MATRIX")

KEANU REEVES: (As Neo) What is the matrix?

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: So we're going to be signing today and registering national emergency.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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