All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4 -7 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 pm, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the more than four decades since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

More information about All Things Considered is available on their website.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Kelly McEvers and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Michel Martin.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators.

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Ways to Connect

Texas Cracks Down On Surprise Medical Billing

5 hours ago

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Trial Begins For Navy SEAL Accused Of War Crimes

6 hours ago

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Protesters in Hong Kong got a boost today when a leading pro-democracy activist was released from jail. Joshua Wong quickly joined the protesters outside Hong Kong government offices.

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We're going to stay in Hong Kong a little longer to hear from one of the protesters who was out in the streets all day. Galileo Cheng is a social affairs executive for the Hong Kong Catholic Institution Staff Association, and he is with us now.

Welcome. Thanks for talking to us.

GALILEO CHENG: Yes. Thank you.

MARTIN: The government says that they've shelved this bill for now. Why is it that so many people still felt they needed to come out to protest?

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We're going to stay in Hong Kong a little longer to hear from one of the protesters who was out in the streets all day. Galileo Cheng is a social affairs executive for the Hong Kong Catholic Institution Staff Association, and he is with us now.

Welcome. Thanks for talking to us.

GALILEO CHENG: Yes. Thank you.

MARTIN: The government says that they've shelved this bill for now. Why is it that so many people still felt they needed to come out to protest?

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We're going to stay in Hong Kong a little longer to hear from one of the protesters who was out in the streets all day. Galileo Cheng is a social affairs executive for the Hong Kong Catholic Institution Staff Association, and he is with us now.

Dr. Ayaz Virji was a Muslim living in small-town, white America.

He had left a good job in a leadership position at a successful hospital in Harrisburg, Penn., in order to practice medicine in a rural, underserved area.

Virji says he "had the BMWs, the nice house, but it wasn't enough for me, I wanted to do more." Rural America faces a shortage of doctors, with many residents forgoing care and saying locations are too far away. "So I felt like I should do something about that. And it was back to the idea: If not me, then who?" he says.

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On Wednesday, a judge ruled that the publisher of the neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer must pay American Muslim comedian Dean Obeidallah $4.1 million for falsely portraying him as a terrorist.

In 2017, Obeidallah, a Daily Beast contributor, wrote an article for the site questioning President Trump's response to white supremacist violence.

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White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said Thursday that the Trump administration is determined to make China play by the rules of international trade.

"You know how you get from here to there?" Kudlow told an audience at a pro-trade think tank in Washington. "You kick some butt."

That's not the kind of dry, technocratic language one usually associates with trade negotiations. But it's another example of how President Trump has turned international commerce into a highly unusual spectator sport.

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In 2008, fire swept through a Universal Studios Hollywood backlot. The loss was thought to be a few movie sets and film duplicates. But earlier this week, The New York Times published a report revealing that the 2008 fire burned hundreds of thousands of master recordings of genre-spanning, legendary music from the late 1940s to the early '80s as well as digital formats and hard drives from the late '80s up through the early 2000s.

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Back in 2008...

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UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #1: And we continue to cover breaking news out of Universal City, where a fire is burning on the Universal backlot.

CORNISH: The fire was enormous, about the equivalent of an entire city block. People all over Los Angeles could see the smoke.

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UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #2: The blaze burned for some 12 hours with 400 firefighters battling to keep it from spreading.

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Back in 2008...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #1: And we continue to cover breaking news out of Universal City, where a fire is burning on the Universal backlot.

CORNISH: The fire was enormous, about the equivalent of an entire city block. People all over Los Angeles could see the smoke.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #2: The blaze burned for some 12 hours with 400 firefighters battling to keep it from spreading.

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