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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Steve Inskeep, Renée Montagne and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go.

For more about Morning Edition, visit their website.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep or David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA.

Some of the most familiar voices are heard regularly including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford, as well as the special weekly series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history. Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States.

Bringing you the morning business news "for the rest of us" in the time it takes you to drink your first cup of joe, Marketplace Morning Report is another great way to start your day with host David Brancaccio. It's heard at 6:51 a.m. and 8:51 a.m. each morning.

Think for a minute about the dizzying number of pizza crust options. Villa Italian Kitchen later this month will begin selling just crust. Isn't crust everyone's favorite part of the pizza?

That's the day the convenience store chain offers free slurpees. Rachel Langford gave birth on July 11 at 7:11 p.m., and the baby weighed 7 pounds, 11 ounces.

Tweets from President Trump on Sunday, telling Democratic female members of Congress to go back to their countries of origin, have led to new accusations of racism against him.

Courtesy of St. Lawrence University's D.P. Church Collection / MSS 057, Special Collections, SLU Libraries

Flooding on Lake Ontario broke records this year. A lot of shoreline residents say they’ve never seen water levels anywhere near this year's, but in fact Lake Ontario has flooded many times before.

Records show a handful of years when water levels came within inches of where they are today.

Dwight Church went by the nickname Dippy. He was born in Canton in 1861 and worked as a photographer. Eventually Church bought his own plane and took pictures from the sky.

He flew all across the North Country.

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Matt Churchill / Flickr

Industries across the country are rapidly growing reliant on internet connectivity. As that expansion continues, getting rural areas connected to the internet is also growing as a pressing issue for the nation's lawmakers.

Last week, a House subcommittee held a hearing about success stories of rural areas that have been able to extend access to broadband internet. The panel included a doctor who uses the internet to provide emergency advice when he's not at the hospital and a farmer who is now able to use software to more efficiently fertilize crops.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

Several bodies of water in central New York have reported harmful algal blooms in recent weeks. With temperatures heating up after a wet spring, conditions are ripe for the blooms. 

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Man Survives Being Swept Over Niagara Falls

Jul 12, 2019

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Payne Horning / WRVO News

New York state will soon require large generators of food waste donate what they can to those in need and compost the rest. The mandate won't go into effect until 2022, but work is already underway in the Mohawk Valley to meet this new recycling challenge.

Bill Rabbia, executive director of the Oneida-Herkimer Solid Waste Authority (OHSWA), says they do their best to make one last use of the trash that ends up in landfills by capturing the methane gas it emits to generate electricity. However, Rabbia says the system is imperfect.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

If you see some turquoise bikes tooling around the streets of Syracuse, they’re part of the city’s new bike sharing program, the first of its kind in the state.

The big buzz about the bikes as the program kicked off, is the fact they aren't just any bike. They are e-bikes. Neil Burke, Syracuse's transportation planner said each bike has a pedal assist component.

“What this does is provide you a boost with an onboard battery, to really get you up to speed, and flatten those hills out," said Burke.

Residents had a chance to try out the bikes earlier this week.

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Former U.S. Attorney On Epstein And Acosta

Jul 11, 2019

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Ask Cokie: Executive Orders

Jul 11, 2019

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Tom Magnarelli / WRVO Public Media

New York State Attorney General Letitia James announced $9 million in grants from her office to address what’s called “zombie homes” or vacant, abandoned homes across the state. The “Zombies 2.0” program provides funding to municipalities, including Syracuse, Auburn and Utica. 

governorandrewcuomo / flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo used the occasion of the ticker tape parade for the U.S. women’s soccer team in Manhattan to sign two bills Wednesday that will make it easier for women in New York to receive pay that is equal to men’s salaries.

The measure mandates equal pay for all employees In New York who do "substantially similar work"   regardless of their gender. It also extends the equal pay provision for workers who are in a protected class, including race, gender identity or disability.

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