Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

A Pulitzer Center grantee, she holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

Updated at 6:03 p.m. ET

Once a celebrated investigative reporter, the publisher of a small Alabama newspaper achieved notoriety this week by saying the Ku Klux Klan should "clean out D.C."

Sen. Lindsey Graham, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, has vowed to launch an investigation into whether top officials at the Justice Department and the FBI had plotted an "administrative coup" to drive President Trump out of office.

Kevin Bishop, a spokesperson for Graham, tells NPR that no date has been set yet for a hearing.

Seven members of Britain's Parliament quit the main opposition Labour Party on Monday, accusing its leader, Jeremy Corbyn, of letting anti-Semitism flourish and failing to support a plan to hold another referendum on Brexit.

"This has been a very difficult, painful but necessary decision," Luciana Berger, one of the seven legislators who have resigned, told reporters at a press conference Monday.

The Department of Homeland Security has announced new guidelines to track child marriages among immigrants in the United States.

While debates on immigration have focused on national security, and President Trump's determination to build a wall along the southern border has resulted in a national emergency declaration, the new rules address a far lesser known immigration issue.

Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, there is no minimum age requirement for a person to request or benefit from visa applications in which spouses or fiancées are minors.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has promised a "befitting reply" for perpetrators and their supporters in the wake of a bombing in Kashmir described as the deadliest in three decades that killed at least 40 Indian police troops and wounded nearly 20 more.

In the attack on Thursday on the outskirts of Srinagar, the capital of Indian-administered Kashmir, a suicide bomber rammed a vehicle with explosives into caravan carrying paramilitary troopers.

An international investigative group says it has identified a third suspect in connection with last year's poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter. The group says the man is a high-ranking officer in the GRU, Russia's military intelligence agency.

Updated at 11:15 a.m. ET

After a long night of bargaining, teachers in Denver who were on strike over wages and bonuses have reached a tentative agreement with school district officials to end their walkout. The strike began Monday, after 15 months of negotiations ended without a deal.

The teachers are expected to be back in most classes today.

Updated on Thursday at 10:45 a.m. ET

Severe mold, asbestos and electrical hazards are among the dangers in private military housing for thousands of service members' families, according to a new survey conducted by the Military Family Advisory Network.

Updated at 3:32 a.m. ET Thursday

Award-winning journalist Maria Ressa was freed on Thursday in the Philippines after posting bail.

"What we're seeing is death by a thousand cuts of our democracy," Ressa told reporters at the Manila court Thursday, according to The Associated Press. She accused the government of using the law to silence criticism.

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

After a long trial held under heightened security at the federal court in Brooklyn, N.Y., a jury has found Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán, one of the world's most notorious drug kingpins who led Mexico's Sinaloa cartel, guilty on all 10 counts related to drug trafficking.

The 61-year-old faces the possibility of life in prison.

Tuesday's verdict ended a dramatic trial that started in November and was filled with explosive testimony from Guzmán's former cartel associates.

Russia is considering a plan to temporarily disconnect from the Internet as a way to gauge how the country's cyberdefenses would fare in the face of foreign aggression, according to Russian media.

The experiment comes as lawmakers there assess the Digital Economy National Program, draft legislation that was submitted to Russia's parliament last year, according to the RBK news agency.

A Russian court has sentenced a Jehovah's Witness to six years in prison for promoting extremism.

"I hope today is the day Russia defends religious freedom," Dennis Christensen, who pleaded not guilty in the trial, said as he walked down the hall of the courthouse before the verdict was read.

More than six years have passed since British photojournalist John Cantlie was abducted by the Islamic State in Syria. On Tuesday, a top official said the British government believes he is still alive.

Speaking to journalists in London, Security Minister Ben Wallace did not disclose the intelligence that led the government to that conclusion. But he said officials believe Cantlie is still being held by ISIS extremists.

Pope Francis wrapped up the first-ever papal trip to the Arabian Peninsula — a visit meant to highlight religious fraternity — by celebrating Mass before tens of thousands of people at a sports stadium in the United Arab Emirates.

The people of El Salvador have chosen a new politician to lead the country, ending three decades of control by two political parties.

Nayib Bukele, 37, held his wife's hand and waved to crowds as Coldplay's "Viva La Vida" boomed from the speakers. "This day is a historic day. This day, El Salvador destroyed the bipartisanship," he said.

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro proposed holding congressional elections earlier than planned, as a high-ranking air force general called on colleagues to join him in disavowing Maduro's presidency and protests continue to shake the country.

"I come here to you to state that I don't recognize the dictatorial authority of Nicolás Maduro," Gen. Francisco Yanez said in a video that has circulated on social media on Saturday.

Updated Feb. 2 at 8:30 a.m. ET

The Trump administration said Friday that the U.S. will formally begin the process of withdrawing from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, the Cold War-era arms control accord with Russia — a move that prompted Russia to announce its own withdrawal on Saturday.

The declaration by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had been expected for months. He said the U.S. will suspend its obligations under the 1987 INF treaty as of Saturday and pull out in six months if Russia isn't deemed to be in compliance.

The trial for Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán, who stands accused of leading one of the world's most infamous drug trafficking organizations, has unfolded like a television drama.

In laying out her closing argument on Wednesday — day 37 of the trial — Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrea Goldbarg presented the jury with a montage of images and intercepted audio which, she said, explicitly laid out how drugs were transported, how police were paid off and how violence coursed through the cartel with Guzmán at its helm.

The State Department warned Americans on Tuesday not to travel to Venezuela, citing crime, civil unrest and the arbitrary detention of U.S. citizens. It came the same day that Venezuela's top prosecutor announced that the opposition leader, whom the United States supports, is being investigated and barred from leaving the country.

On Tuesday, Pakistan's Supreme Court upheld its acquittal of a Christian woman who had been sentenced to death for blasphemy in 2010, clearing the way for her to leave the country as radical Islamists seethe.

Asia Bibi, a mother and illiterate farmhand of Christian faith, spent eight years on death row, until the country's top court acquitted her last October, sparking massive protests across Pakistan.

It's summertime in Australia, and the country is in the throes of a record-breaking heat wave that has brought suffering to humans, animals and land.

Temperatures in the south have soared past 118 degrees Fahrenheit.

Australia's State Emergency Service declared the heat wave a threat to public safety, as an increasing number of Australians have called ambulances and gone to hospitals in Adelaide for heat-associated illnesses.

A 3-year-old boy who went missing on Tuesday has been found alive, surviving cold, rain and presumably critters in North Carolina's woods.

"It's the outcome that we always hope for, that we strive for every single time," Shelley Lynch, a spokeswoman for the FBI Charlotte field office, tells NPR.

Casey Hathaway was last seen Tuesday afternoon playing with two other children in his great-grandmother's yard in the town of Ernul, N.C. He didn't come back into the house.

When Casey couldn't be found, his family contacted the police.

A Minnesota-based company that offered a reward for the whereabouts of Jayme Closs, a 13-year-old who was abducted in October, announced that it will give her the money after she freed herself.

"Our hope is that a trust fund can be used for Jayme's needs today and in the future," Jennie-O Turkey Store president Steve Lykken said in a statement released Wednesday.

A top European court has found faults in how Italian police initially questioned Amanda Knox, an American who was imprisoned for nearly four years in Italy after her roommate was killed, and ordered Italy to pay her damages.

"Ms Knox had been particularly vulnerable, being a foreign young woman, 20 at the time, not having been in Italy for very long and not being fluent in Italian," the European Court of Human Rights said in a statement Thursday.

One of the last remaining Navajo Code Talkers, who relayed messages that were never decoded by enemies in World War II, has died at age 94.

Alfred Newman died Sunday afternoon at a New Mexico nursing home, one of his sons, Kevin Newman, tells NPR.

He says his father was a quiet yet courageous man. "My dad told me that the U.S. was in trouble and when they were calling for him, he needed to answer that call with the armed forces," he says.

A hint of a cotton plant is growing on the moon, inside China's lunar lander, scientists in China say.

Photos released on Tuesday by Chongqing University, in collaboration with the China National Space Administration, show the small, green shoot from a cotton seed reaching out of a latticed container aboard the probe Chang'e-4, named after the Chinese lunar goddess.

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Around 40 people have been detained and another two killed in the latest crackdown on Chechnya's LGBT community, Russian activists say.

The "new wave of persecution" started at the end of December, the Russian LGBT Network say in a statement on Monday.

Authorities detained an administrator of a social media group on Russia's VKontakte, where homosexual men from the North Caucasus communicated, the network says.

Updated at 1:45 a.m. ET

A Canadian man who appealed his 15-year prison sentence in China for drug smuggling was instead sentenced to death — a swift ruling that has led some experts to believe Beijing is applying pressure to Canada after last month's arrest of Chinese tech executive Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver.

Seeking to quell concern about the U.S. troop withdrawal from Syria, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Saturday described the American exit as a "tactical change" in military strategy that wouldn't deter efforts to defeat ISIS or hurt U.S. interests in the region.

Pompeo's remarks in Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, come after the Pentagon announced Friday that "the process of our deliberate withdrawal" had begun.

China is letting more than 2,000 ethnic Kazakhs drop their Chinese citizenship and leave the country, according to Kazakhstan's Foreign Ministry.

The Associated Press first reported Beijing's decision, which was later confirmed by the ministry.

It's unclear who among the ethnic Kazakh community can leave China or under what circumstances. China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs did not immediately respond to NPR's request for comment.

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