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Cuomo encourages snowmobilers to visit the Tug Hill

Governor Andrew Cuomo has waived the registration fee for out of state snowmobiles during the weekend of March 7th. Cuomo made the announcement in Lowville Thursday before heading out on a snowmobile tour through the Tug Hill.

Cuomo stood behind a sign with a twist on the “I Love New York” logo. A graphic of a snowmobile stood in place of the classic red heart. Snowmobiling brings in over $850 million to New York and Cuomo wants to draw attention to the state’s 10,000 miles of trails. He says promoting New York tourism is important for two reasons. First, it’s fun and second because its big business.

“We’ve spent a lot of time trying to tell people about the assets of New York and what we have," said Cuomo. "We want them to come up, we want them to visit and we want them to spend money while they do it."

Cuomo credited investments in the tourism industry for improving the North Country’s economy.

“The region of the state that has had the greatest drop in unemployment over the last four years? The north country. No one would have believed that four years ago. It flipped 180 degrees. In the North Country unemployment dropped more than it did in New York City. Just think of that," he said.

After his speech, Cuomo looked eager to get out on the trails.  He was in a rush to answer questions and when he was done he made a b-line for the door.

Bill Farber, head of the Hamilton County board of supervisors was among the crew of local legislatures waiting to venture out with the governor.  

“Snowmobiling really is a sport that is the economy of the Tug Hill, the economy of the Adirondacks in the winter. So to focus this kind of attention on snowmobiling really is great for the North Country. It’s the only game in town this time of the year,” Farber said.

Cuomo suited up and helped his two daughters on their sleds. A few minutes later, a line of about 20 snowmobiles revved up their engines and disappeared into the woods.