education

Mental, physical health closely intertwined

Dec 22, 2018
George Hodan/Public Domain Pictures

Though current research showing mental health and physical health affect each other in many ways has come a long way, there is still more progress that needs to be made to better understand these two closely connected areas of overall health.

Dr. John Campo joins us on "Take Care" to discuss. He's the chief behavioral wellness officer in the Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute and assistant dean for behavioral health professor at West Virginia University School of Medicine. Campo said mental and physical health cannot be approached in isolation.

David Woo / Flickr

In an article published in Slate Magazine, author Erica S. Perl advocated for an increase in books available and written for children on suicide and severe mental conditions to spread awareness and help eliminate the stigma that often comes with the subject of mental health.

Perl, author of “All Three Stooges” and other books, wrote “Alone in the Dark: Why we need more children’s books about suicide and severe depression” to explain why mental health education is important at a young age. She joined us to discuss her latest book and the article on "Take Care."

APM Reports

For generations, educators have fought about how kids learn to read and what that means about how they should be taught. Now, there is definitive evidence from neuroscience on how the brain learns to read and it suggests very different approaches to reading instruction than those that are commonly found in schools.

This APM Reports documentary explores why the reading science is not making its way into American classrooms – or teacher preparation programs – and what can be done about it.

Tune in on Sunday, September 23 at 7 p.m. on WRVO.

APM Reports

Apprenticeships are having a moment. Supporters on both the right and the left say the “earn while you learn” approach can help create a more skilled workforce, provide a path to solid, middle-class careers, and serve as a needed corrective to the “college for all” push that has left some students with piles of debt and no obvious career.

In this APM Reports documentary, we ask: How can apprenticeships expand to include careers beyond the traditional trades and reach new populations searching for a foothold in the middle class?

APM Reports

Mario Martinez and Katy Sorto were the first in their families to go to college. They started at community college in 2008 hoping to earn degrees, but the odds were against them. Both are from low-income families, they ended up in remedial classes, and they knew almost no one who had been to college. This APM Reports documentary tells their remarkable stories 10 years later and provides a rare window on the personal experience of trying to move up through education.

Join us Sunday, September 9 at 7 p.m. on WRVO.

Human brain not built for modern society

Jul 21, 2018
John Medina

Though current American society often demands a monotonous daily routine for both adults and adolescents, a Seattle-based scientist and author argues workplaces and schools operate in a way counter to how the human brain functions best.

John Medina is a developmental molecular biologist and affiliate professor of bioengineering at the University of Washington School of Medicine. In his book, “Brain Rules,” he asserts that everybody’s brain is different, but none are perfectly suited for the life that modern American society presents.

Indiana Stan / Flickr

With the demand for schools to focus more on academics and less on gym class, many districts in the U.S. have cut back students’ physical education times or eliminated them completely. However, an author and authority on the connection between brain activity and fitness said the two goals of fitness and academic success are not mutually exclusive.

Dr. John Ratey, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and internationally recognized expert on neuropsychiatry, spoke with “Take Care” about the importance of physical exercise on brain development, especially when it comes to adolescents.

Emily Hanford

One in five American children has a hard time learning to read. Many of these kids have dyslexia. There are proven ways to help people with dyslexia learn, and a federal law that's supposed to ensure schools provide kids with help. But across the country, public schools are denying children proper treatment and often failing to identify them with dyslexia in the first place.

This APM Reports documentary investigates why, and explores how improving things for dyslexic kids could help all students learn to read better.

Ellender Memorial Library, Nicholls State University

A growing number of colleges and universities in the eastern United States are confronting their historic ties to the slave trade. Profits from slavery and related industries helped build some of the most prestigious schools in New England. In many southern states, enslaved people built and maintained college campuses.

Andy Vasoyan / APM Reports

This weekend, WRVO continues our series of education documentaries from American Public Media. This week: the issues undocumented students face when they try to continue their education.

U.S. public schools must treat undocumented students like citizens. But once these students graduate, everything changes. Without papers, they don't qualify for federal college grants, they can't legally work to pay for tuition, and they may have to pay out-of-state tuition.

Emily Hanford / APM Reports

This weekend, WRVO begins a series of four education documentaries from American Public Media. This week, in the first episode: understanding the issue of getting good teachers and, more importantly, keeping them.

There may be nothing more important in the educational life of a child than having effective teachers, but U.S. schools are struggling to attract and keep them. The problem is most acute in rural areas, where kids may learn math from a social studies teacher. In urban schools, those most likely to leave are black men, who make up just 2 percent of teachers.

Join us this Sunday for the next "Intelligence Squared U.S." debate. This time, we take a look at the charter school.

In the 25 years since Minnesota passed the first charter school law, these publicly funded but privately operated schools have become a highly sought-after alternative to traditional public education, particularly for underserved students in urban areas. Between 2004 and 2014 alone, charter school enrollment increased from less than 1 million to 2.5 million students.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Construction will begin soon on Syracuse’s Near West Side to create OnTECH, a charter school targeted towards helping refugees and at-risk students get their high school diplomas.

OnTECH founder Ellen Eagen describes the mission of the school as “dovetailing this child who’s on the cusp of falling off of the educational pipeline with an employable skill set and with this idea of reengaging them with their curiosity in education.”

College Choice: The Value of It All

Nov 30, 2016
Elissa Nadworny / NPR

A special from NPR News, "College Choice: The Value of It All" follows nine college seniors. NPR's Robert Siegel spent more than a year checking in with the students, talking with them about their choice of school and how things turned out.

Join us for the last in our special series on education from American RadioWorks. "Rewriting the Sentence: College Behind Bars" explores how providing education to inmates can reduce recidivism.

For decades, the United States' prison population has grown exponentially and today, more than two million Americans are incarcerated. But most people who enter prison eventually come out, and every year about 700,000 prisoners return to society. About half of those released will be back behind bars within three years.

The latest in our series on education, "What it Takes: Chasing Graduation at High Poverty High Schools," examines the reason why nearly 20 percent of students don't finish high school.

There is virtually no way to make a legal living these days without at least a high school diploma. Still, this 20 percent exists. Why?

Another broadcast in our series on education this month, we bring you "Spare the Rod: Reforming School Discipline" this Sunday.

Kids who are suspended or expelled from school are more likely to drop out and more likely to wind up in prison than kids with similar behaviors who are not kicked out. Kids of color are more likely to be suspended or expelled than white kids are. Schools are struggling to reduce suspensions and to find other ways to make sure classrooms are calm and safe.

From American RadioWorks and American Public Media, join us this Sunday for "Stuck at Square One: The Remedial Education Trap."

When students go to college, they expect to be in college classes. But in fact, 4 in 10 students end up in basic math and English, re-learning what they were supposed to learn in high school. The vast majority of them never get a college degree. What's going on? Most people point to failures in the nation's K-12 education system, but this documentary probes deeper, exploring how students are placed into these classes, what skills people really need to be successful in college, and how best to learn those skills.

Women in tech: working to boost the numbers

Feb 13, 2016
PBS.org / WXXI


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More women are adding terms like coder and game developer to their resumes, but the industry still has a long way to go to reach gender parity.

Meredith Turk

Going back to school is challenging for veterans. The majority who enroll in two or four year colleges across the nation don’t complete their degree. Jefferson Community College in Watertown and SUNY Canton will be awarded over $1 million this year to help more veterans graduate. School administrators say individual attention is key.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo in his State of the State speech was far less combative than in the past when it comes to education. But, education groups say while they are pleased that Cuomo has reversed his previous unpopular positions, they say his school aid funding proposal still falls short.

The governor, who has attacked components of the public school system as an “education bureaucracy” that must be broken, instead stuck to the positive in this year’s State of the State address.

“We will not rest until our K-12 system is the best in the nation,” Cuomo said.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Gov. Andrew is to deliver a joint State of the State and budget speech later today, during which the governor is expected to focus on ethics and education policies.

Jason Devaun / Flickr

The Syracuse City School District is revisiting the debate over how far children should have to walk to school. A group representing parents, teachers and students contend that two miles is too far to walk.

Kama Ndbay is a junior at Henninger High School. He’s an honor student and his first class of the day is Advanced Placement English.

“In all my other classes I have a 90 or above," Ndbay said. "But in that class I have an 83.”

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Onondaga-Cortland-Madison Boces is expanding their career-embedded programs and opening a new high school in Cortland County. This comes as a high percentage of students in Cortland County attend career and technical education programs.

Karen Dewitt / WRVO News

The leaders of school districts, teachers unions, and parents are presenting a united front in calling for $2.2 billion more school aid next year.  They say a hard property tax cap with a zero percent increase is making it even more crucial that state lawmakers help them out.

xMizLitx / Flickr

 

Three-quarters of school districts in the state have applied for waivers from the new teacher evaluation rules set out by Gov.Andrew Cuomo and the legislature in March. The news comes amidst lots of changes, including the leadership of the state Board of Regents.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

Now that school’s out, the Syracuse City School District will start offering breakfast and lunch to inner city children through its Summer Food Service Program.  But the program doesn’t reach all the children who may be going hungry without that daily breakfast, lunch and snack they get during the school year.

stgermh / Flickr

The chairwoman of the Assembly Education Committee says an education tax credit bill pressed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo is not appropriate for the state at this time.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

Syracuse-area Rep. John Katko is touring schools in central New York this week, looking for ways to strengthen education policy.

It’s a story Katko says he’s heard again and again: federally mandated standardized testing is stifling teaching flexibility, and forcing all children to be taught in a one-size-fits-all curriculum. To make his point at a news conference Tuesday, he read a letter he received from an Onondaga County sixth grader, upset at the way he sees test prep taking over schools.

New York rolls out pocket-size English lessons

Apr 29, 2015
Kenneth Buker / Flickr

Learning a new language is tough. And for immigrant farmworkers, long work days and lack of transportation can pose extra barriers. New York state has an idea to change that. It’s a language lesson that fits in your pocket. Just dial up the state’s new "English on the Go" line from your cell phone. The free lessons are interactive, with audio and text messages.

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