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Elections
Democracy in Action is an Election Day project of the student journalists of the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University.Students on assignment represent all the journalism programs at the Newhouse school, including graduates and undergraduates in Broadcast and Digital Journalism; Magazine, Newspaper and Online Journalism, Multimedia, Photography and Design and students in Military programs.

Voters at Nottingham High School polling site urge everyone to vote

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David Onoue
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Democracy in Action, 2016
Voters at the Nottingham High School poll location wait in line for the polls to open at 6 a.m.

Twenty-two voters waited in line for the polls to open at 6 a.m. at Nottingham High School.

First in line to cast her ballot was Assemblywoman Pamela Hunter, who is running unopposed for re-election in the 128th district. Hunter was happy to have been able to vote for herself this morning and felt relieved to be here, but with trepidation after a difficult and hard fought election cycle.

“I think that many people are anxious because they don’t know if their candidate is going to win, but I say to people who don’t know what they are going to do, you have to at least show up and vote,” Hunter said.

Michael Miller also felt relieved after casting his ballot. “All the advertising and all the hullabaloo is finally over, and people can make a decision,” he said.

One voter who felt good after casting his ballot was Stephen Bero. “I thought about all the different candidates in all the different races, and for some time, and I want what’s best for us in the United States of America and for the people of America,” he said.

However, Bero, who is proud to be able to vote in New York state, also thought the Electoral College system is antiquated and archaic. “You could win the popular vote and still not win the election, and that needs to be changed,” Bero said.

Bero did make one bold prediction. “I think you’re going to find out at the end of the day that the popular vote is going to elect Donald Trump,” he said.

Also feeling particularly good after voting was Anne Marie Higgins. “I feel fantabulous,” she said. “Because I just helped elect the first woman president.”

Regardless of the outcome, all four individuals stressed the importance of going to your polling location to vote.

For those still on the fence and thinking about not voting because they don’t care for either major political party candidate, Higgins has this advice. “Don’t be stupid, and go vote. Vote your conscience, but vote for the person who will help you the most,” she said.

Democracy in Action in an Election Day project of the student journalists of the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University.