Richard Gonzales

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

Police authorities in Northern Ireland are searching for several suspects in the shooting death of a young journalist during a riot Thursday night in the city of Londonderry.

Lyra McKee, 29, was killed, apparently by a stray bullet, as she was standing near a police vehicle during unrest in Londonderry's Creggan neighborhood.

A federal appeals panel has upheld California's controversial "sanctuary state" law, ruling that the measure does not impede the enforcement of federal immigration laws in that state.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, in a unanimous decision, found that the state law, known as SB 54, limiting cooperation between state and local law enforcement and federal immigration authorities does not conflict with federal law.

The New York State Office of Court Administration issued new rules Wednesday curtailing the ability of federal immigration officials to arrest immigrants in state courthouses without warrants.

The rules are the latest development in the ongoing controversy over the presence of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents in state and local courthouses to arrest immigrants appearing there on unrelated cases.

Updated at 5:27 p.m. ET Wednesday

Pledges of hundreds of millions of euros are rolling in from wealthy French and international donors to pay for the planned reconstruction of the Notre Dame Cathedral damaged in Monday's dramatic fire.

The promised donations were announced Tuesday as fire investigators continue to assess the damage to the architectural landmark built over 850 years ago.

The Trump administration has agreed to settle a lawsuit with a dozen Central American families who challenged the government's cancellation of a program that was designed to reunite children in that region with their parents living in the U.S.

As a result, some 2,700 children living in Central America may be allowed to enter the U.S. at a time when the Trump administration is actively trying to dissuade other migrants from attempting to come to this country.

The unmanned Israeli spacecraft Beresheet, a privately funded mission, failed upon its final descent to the moon Thursday, dashing hopes of joining the ranks of global superpowers in successfully landing on the lunar surface.

American Media LLC announced that it is seeking a buyer for the National Enquirer and other newsprint tabloids it owns.

The company said in a statement that it has decided to "explore strategic options for its National Enquirer (US and UK editions), Globe and National Examiner brands, which will likely result in their sale in the near future."

The European Union has agreed to delay the United Kingdom's departure from the EU, known as Brexit, until Oct. 31.

The deal, announced early Thursday in Brussels, averts a potential crisis as British leaders had failed to agree on their own plan for pulling out of the multi-state trade arrangement by Friday.

British Prime Minister Theresa May again called on Parliament to approve her Brexit deal.

Texas Tech University's medical school has agreed to end its consideration of race in selecting candidates for admission, an outcome actively sought by the Trump administration.

The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center submitted to pressure from the Education Department's Office on Civil Rights, which had conducted a 14-year probe into the use of affirmative action in admission policies at the medical school. The agreement is the first reached by the administration and a school to stop using race as an admissions factor.

The Trump administration has canceled a deal between Major League Baseball and the Cuban Baseball Federation that would have allowed Cuban players to join professional teams in the U.S. and Canada.

Under the four-month-old agreement, a major league club seeking to sign certain Cuban players would have to pay a release fee – 25 percent over the player's signing bonus – to the Federation. The player would also have to pay Cuban income taxes on foreign earnings.

Venezuela's Constituent Assembly voted unanimously to strip self-proclaimed interim president Juan Guaidó of immunity in a move his supporters fear may signal the impending arrest and prosecution of the opposition leader who is challenging the rule of President Nicolás Maduro.

Until now, Maduro has refrained from jailing Guaidó, who has the support of the Trump administration and several dozen other countries. The Constituent Assembly is loyal to Maduro.

A federal judge in Montgomery is again hearing arguments over efforts to stop a wave on inmate suicides in Alabama's overcrowded and understaffed prison system

U.S District Judge Myron Thompson is hearing testimony on whether the state has adequately responded to 15 suicide deaths in the past 15 months.

President Trump is extending for one year a program that gives Liberians protected status from deportation. The president's action affects some 4,000 Liberians living in the U.S.

A Michigan police investigator who looked into allegations that Larry Nassar sexually molested girls and young women in 2004 admits that he was fooled by the now-convicted sports doctor and didn't pursue the case.

"I believed his lies," said Meridian Township, Mich., Detective Andrew McCready.

A jury in Pennsylvania has acquitted a white former police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black teenager in the back, setting off a series of angry protests.

Michael Rosfeld was a rookie officer with the East Pittsburgh Police Department who had been sworn in just hours before shooting 17-year-old Antwon Rose II last June. Rosfeld was charged with murder.

A fire at a petrochemical plant outside of Houston briefly reignited Friday, sending up another plume of black smoke at a site where a blaze had erupted earlier this week. The fire was preceded by a chemical spill into the Houston Ship Channel.

Updated at 10:20 p.m. ET

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and other New Zealanders packed a public park in Christchurch on Friday to listen to the Muslim call to prayer one week after a gunman attacked two mosques, killing 50 people.

The call to prayer was broadcast nationwide and was followed by two minutes of silence.

Ardern led mourners at Hagley Park adjacent to the Al Noor Mosque where most of the victims were slain. The mosque itself remains closed for renovations but is scheduled to reopen next week.

A Florida man accused of mailing pipe bombs to a number of prominent Democrats and Trump critics, as well as CNN, has pleaded guilty before a federal judge in New York.

The U.S. Border Patrol is releasing asylum-seeking migrants who were recently apprehended in Texas' Rio Grande Valley without detaining them because officials say detention facilities are full to capacity.

The Border Patrol released 50 migrants on Tuesday rather than turn them over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement for detention. Another 200 will have been released Wednesday, an official at Customs and Border Protection told NPR.

The U.S. Supreme Court, narrowly divided along ideological lines, ruled Tuesday that the government may detain — without a hearing — legal immigrants long after they have served the sentences for crimes they committed.

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, in her first speech to her nation's Parliament after last week's terrorist attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, said the gunman should be denied the publicity he was seeking.

"That's why you will never hear me mention his name," said Ardern. "He is a terrorist, he is a criminal, he is an extremist. But he will, when I speak, be nameless."

The alleged shooter had written a 74-page screed promoting his white supremacist views and had livestreamed his attack on the Al Noor mosque in Christchurch.

Updated at 4:37 a.m. ET

Forty-nine people are dead and at least 20 are seriously injured in what New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says "can now only be described as a terrorist attack."

Updated at 9:40 p.m. ET

A federal grand jury in Albuquerque has indicted five residents of a rural New Mexico compound on new terrorism-related charges connected to an alleged conspiracy to attack FBI and military personnel.

The new president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Felix Tshisekedi, signed a decree Wednesday pardoning about 700 political prisoners and fulfilling a promise he made in his inaugural address in January.

A U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant was arraigned Monday on gun and drug charges in a case authorities say linked him to a plot to killed several prominent Democrats and broadcast journalists.

Christopher Hasson, 49, pleaded not guilty to charges of illegal possession of firearm silencers, possession of firearms by a drug addict and unlawful user, and possession of a controlled substance.

Maryland's highest court, in a split 4-3 decision, ruled that there will be no new trial for convicted killer Adnan Syed, the man who gained national attention as the subject of the popular Serial podcast.

The ruling reverses a lower appellate court decision and reinstates Syed's 2000 conviction for strangling his former girlfriend, 17-year-old Hae Min Lee, a year earlier. Her body was found buried in a Baltimore park.

A federal judge in California who ordered the Trump administration to reunite more than 2,800 migrant families separated at the southwest border says potentially thousands more could be affected by his ruling.

U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw of San Diego said in a preliminary ruling issued late Friday that parents who were separated from their children on or after July 1, 2017, should be included as part of a class-action lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union.

TV actor Jussie Smollett has been indicted by a Cook County grand jury on 16 felony counts of disorderly conduct for filing a false police report that he was assaulted.

The panel returned the charges on Thursday.

Someone in South Carolina claimed the $1.5 billion jackpot from the Mega Millions lottery held in October 2018, ending the mystery of whether anyone would ever come forward to say they had won.

The winner, who has elected to remain anonymous, chose the one-time payment cash option, making their prize worth nearly $878,000,000. It is the largest jackpot payout to a single winner in U. S. history, according to a statement by South Carolina Education Lottery Commission.

Updated at 11:21 p.m. ET

President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, at their summit meeting on Thursday in Hanoi, Vietnam, expressed optimism about reaching a deal over nuclear arms.

Asked by a reporter if he is willing to "denuclearize," Kim said, "If I'm not willing to do that, I wouldn't be here right now."

Earlier, Trump had said he's in "no rush," adding "We just want to do the right deal."

Kim, speaking through an interpreter, said, "From what I feel right now, I do have a feeling that good results will come out."

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