Richard Gonzales

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

More than half of the workforce of the Internal Revenue Service, or about 46,000 employees, will be recalled to work for the tax filing season despite the partial government shutdown, according to a Treasury Department announcement.

The recalled employees will not be paid during the shutdown, now in its fourth week, although all federal workers have been promised back pay when funding is approved.

Almost 43,000 immigration court hearings have been canceled as a result of the partial government shutdown, freezing an already heavily backlogged system, according to a report by researchers tracking immigration data. Another 20,000 hearings will be canceled for every additional week the government is not operating.

Updated at 4:28 p.m. ET

President Trump, amid the longest shutdown in U.S. history, has channeled his wrath at the FBI, following a New York Times report that the agency launched an investigation into whether he had been working on Russia's behalf when he fired James Comey as director of the bureau in May 2017.

Trump took to Twitter on Saturday, beginning a stream of angry tweets around 7 a.m. He did not refute the Times' reporting but instead went after the integrity of the nation's main federal law enforcement agency.

The Congolese capital of Kinshasa is reported relatively quiet early Thursday morning as the nation's electoral commission waited until the wee hours to declare opposition leader Felix Tshisekedi the provisional winner of last month's long-delayed presidential election in the Democratic Republic of Congo. But runner-up Martin Fayulu is disputing the results, condemning the election results as "rigged, fabricated and invented," according to the Associated Press.

A federal judge in California dealt utility giant PG&E another setback Wednesday by proposing to restrict the beleaguered company from using unsafe power lines during the 2019 California fire season.

U.S. District Judge William Alsup in San Francisco, who is overseeing the utility after a 2010 gas pipeline explosion, said the company should be required to "remove or trim all trees that could fall onto its power lines" and reinspect its grid.

The utility has two weeks to respond as Judge Alsup set a new hearing for Jan. 30.

Two South Carolina sheriff's deputies will be charged in connection with the deaths of two women who drowned in a locked and overturned van while they were being transported during Hurricane Florence on Sept. 18.

Utility giant Pacific Gas and Electric is being accused of falsifying gas pipeline safety records by California regulators in the aftermath of a pipeline explosion that killed eight people in 2010.

The California Public Utilities Commission says it has opened a proceeding for what its staff says are "systemic violations of rules" governing pipeline safety. An investigation found that the utility falsified records over a five-year period.

A federal judge in Texas issued a ruling Friday declaring the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional, apparently setting the stage for another hearing on the health care law by the U.S. Supreme Court.

The ruling by U.S. District Judge Reed O'Connor invalidates what's commonly referred to as Obamacare nationwide and casts into doubt the survival of the law on the eve of the deadline for tens of millions of Americans to sign up for health care coverage in 2019.

French authorities say the man suspected of launching a shooting attack on the Strasbourg Christmas market that killed three people and wounded 13 others was slain by police Thursday, ending an extensive two-day manhunt.

The suspect had evaded police since the attack Tuesday night, despite a massive search involving hundreds of police and soldiers.

Updated on December 12, 12:20 p.m. ET

In an uncommonly contentious public exchange in the Oval Office with House and Senate Democratic leaders, President Trump made several remarks about the southern border with Mexico justifying his demand for billions of dollars to build a wall to restrict illegal immigration.

Trump said:

Updated at 8:27 a.m. ET Tuesday

A gunman opened fire at a Christmas market in Strasbourg, France, killing at least two people and wounding nearly a dozen others, according to conflicting preliminary reports, some of which put the death toll higher.

After initially saying that three people were dead, on Wednesday morning, police updated that total to say two people were dead and one person brain dead.

The scene is confusing and events fast-moving as French police search for the suspected shooter, who is still at large.

New government figures released Friday show that the U.S. Border Patrol arrested 51,856 individuals attempting to illegally cross the southern border in November. That's a 78 percent increase over the same period last year.

The escalating arrests represent a high-water mark for apprehensions under the Trump administration and the number of those apprehended are increasingly adults with children.

Federal prosecutors said Thursday they would not seek to retry a U.S. Border Patrol agent who was twice acquitted of fatally shooting a Mexican teenager through a border fence in Nogales, Ariz.

Jose Antonio Elena Rodriguez, 16, was killed by Border Patrol agent Lonnie Swartz on October 2012. The agent said he was acting in self-defense when threatened by rock throwers on the Mexican side of the border.

Updated at 7:55 p.m. ET Friday

The Marine Corps has identified the fighter pilot who died in a crash that occurred while practicing in-flight refueling off the coast of Japan. He was Capt. Jahmar Resilard, 28, of Miramar, Fla.

Another service member was rescued and five are still missing.

The Marine Corps said Resilard served with Marine All Weather Fighter Attack Squadron 242, stationed on Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni in Yamaguchi, Japan, according to the Associated Press.

Updated at 10:10 p.m. ET

A U.S. Border Patrol supervisor has been charged with capital murder and, if convicted, could get the death penalty in the deaths of four women in September in Texas. Authorities say he confessed to the killings.

Christmas wouldn't be Christmas without the tradition dinner, even in space.

So a shipment of smoked turkey breast, cranberry sauce, candied yams and, of course, fruitcake was rocketed to the International Space Station Wednesday with delivery expected by Saturday.

But as the Associated Press reports, the launch was delayed by a day because food for some of the station's other residents was moldy.

Updated at 9:37 p.m. ET

The Department of Defense will begin assigning thousands of immigrants holding green cards to basic training, reversing a Trump administration policy that delayed their service as they were subjected to enhanced background checks.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker is calling for the temporary removal of a state judge who allegedly helped an undocumented immigrant to evade immigration authorities who were in a courthouse waiting to detain him.

Newton District Judge Shelley Joseph is being investigated by a federal grand jury for aiding other court personnel in arranging for Jose Medina-Perez, 38, and from the Dominican Republic, to slip out of a back door of the courthouse while agents from Immigration and Customs Enforcement held a detainer for his arrest. The incident occurred in early April.

The white former Dallas police officer who shot and killed her unarmed black neighbor in his apartment, which she says she had entered it by mistake, was indicted on a murder charge by a grand jury Friday.

A federal grand jury indicted three members of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department on charges of beating a fellow police officer who was working undercover during a 2017 protest. A fourth officer also was indicted and accused conspiring to cover up the incident.

The Department of Justice announced the indictments in a statement Thursday.

Amid the current headlines about migrant caravans and an "invasion" of unauthorized immigrants, the number of immigrants living in the U.S. illegally actually fell to its lowest level in more than a decade, a new study finds.

Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said the Trump administration will appeal a federal judge's ruling temporarily blocking the government from unilaterally imposing new asylum rules.

Speaking at a news conference at the U.S.-Mexico border, Nielsen said of the decision Monday by U.S. District Judge Jon S. Tigar, "this is a dangerous ruling."

President Trump's effort to limit the number of people seeking asylum in the United States faced legal challenges in two different federal courts on Monday.

Updated at 10:58 p.m. ET

Firefighters are making progress against several large fires in California, and they're holding the line against the deadliest wildfire in state history. But officials continue to tally the losses, and emergency crews are still trying to protect people and property from the flames.

The Camp Fire has killed at least 56 people and ravaged entire neighborhoods in Paradise and other Northern California towns.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection announced that effective Tuesday morning it will close four vehicle lanes at the Southern border with Mexico at Tijuana to prepare for the migrants working their way north to the United States.

The travelers have said they plan to ask for asylum.

Three northbound lanes will be closed at San Ysidro and another lane at Otay Mesa will also be closed to install "port hardening infrastructure equipment," the agency said in a statement.

Updated at 5:15 a.m. ET on Friday

A fast-moving Northern California wildfire has forced tens of thousands of people to evacuate, with residents fleeing through flames and leaving their cars to take cover in nearby stores.

The Camp Fire started Thursday morning near Paradise, a town of around 27,000 people some 90 miles north of Sacramento. By Thursday evening, the town was a scene of widespread destruction, and hundreds of structures were reduced to rubble.

Updated at 11 p.m. ET

A federal appeals court in California has blocked the Trump administration from immediately terminating an Obama-era program protecting from deportation young immigrants brought illegally to the U.S. as children.

Updated at 9:40 p.m. ET

The White House announced late Wednesday that it is temporarily suspending press credentials from CNN's Jim Acosta.

The announcement came in a statement by White House press secretary Sarah Sanders. It followed an unusually contentious press conference held by President Trump in the East Room of the White House in which the president called Acosta "a rude, terrible person."

Updated at 9 p.m. ET

Four Tennessee death row inmates challenging the constitutionality of capital punishment in their state are asking a federal judge to allow them to bypass lethal injections or the electric chair in favor of another method: death by firing squad.

With days to go before the midterm elections, President Trump has tried time and again to turn the nation's attention to immigration with headline-grabbing moves.

On Monday, Trump announced the deployment of thousands of active-duty troops to the Southwest border. On Tuesday, he said he's considering an end-run around the constitutional right to citizenship for those born on U.S. soil.

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