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TED Radio Hour
Saturday at 6 p.m. and Sunday at 11 a.m.

TED Radio Hour investigates the biggest questions of our time with the help of the world's greatest thinkers. Can we preserve our humanity in the digital age? Where does creativity come from? And what's the secret to living longer? In each episode, host Manoush Zomorodi explores a big idea through a series of TED Talks and original interviews, inspiring us to learn more about the world, our communities, and most importantly, ourselves.

Find more information, talks and videos, on the TED Talks website.

Based on Talks given by riveting speakers on the world-renowned TED stage, each show is centered on a common theme – such as the source of happiness, crowd-sourcing innovation, power shifts, or inexplicable connections – and injects soundscapes and conversations that bring these ideas to life. 

TED Radio Hour is a co-production of NPR and TED.

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  • Information feels more accessible than ever, but the ways we store data are surprisingly fragile. Can we save anything forever? This hour, TED speakers explore preserving our past, present and future. Guests include artist CM Ralph, digital librarian Brewster Kahle, molecular biologist Dina Zielinski and archaeologist Chris Fisher.
  • Original broadcast date: April 8, 2022. Giving and receiving care—it's a natural part of life. But how do we offer the best possible support for our loved ones? This hour, TED speakers share ideas on reimagining caregiving.
  • Resolutions are easy to make, even easier to break. But what if a story or idea can motivate us in a whole new way? This hour, TED speakers offer different perspectives on our most common resolutions. Guests include neuroscientists Wendy Suzuki and Sandra Aamodt, science journalist Catherine Price, behavioral scientist Wendy De La Rosa, and authors Pico Iyer and A.J. Jacobs.
  • Original broadcast date: Friday, May 20, 2022. "Reduce, reuse, recycle." We've heard that for decades - but does it work? This hour, TED speakers reimagine the well-known slogan and reconsider how we think about what we consume and throw away. Guests include right-to-repair advocate Gay Gordon-Byrne, materials scientist Andrew Dent, technologist Jamie Beard and animal scientist Ermias Kebreab.
  • Original broadcast date: June 17, 2022. Musician Jacob Collier is known for his electrifying performances and thoughtful views on art and humanity. This hour, Jacob joins us for a conversation on the sparks that fuel his creative process.
  • As a special bonus, we're sharing an episode from a new TED podcast, ReThinking with Adam Grant. Adam joins neuroscientist Chantel Prat, who dispels what you thought you knew about your brain.
  • Our brains are magnificently complex - and highly fallible. This hour, neuroscientist and novelist Lisa Genova explains how to keep our brains healthy and what to do when something goes wrong.
  • Original broadcast date: February 19, 2021. When A.J. Jacobs set out to thank everyone who made his morning cup of coffee, he realized the chain of thank-you's was endless. This hour, Jacobs shares ideas on gratitude—and how to make it count.
  • We think our faces are our own. But technology can use them to identify, influence and mimic us. This week, TED speakers explore the promise and peril of turning the human face into a digital tool. Guests include super recognizer Yenny Seo, Bloomberg columnist Parmy Olson, visual researcher Mike Seymour and investigative journalist Alison Killing.
  • Original broadcast date: June 25, 2021. For centuries, humans have relied on the oceans for resources and food... but even the deepest sea has its limits. This hour, TED speakers discuss how we can save our seas to save our planet.
  • Original broadcast date: June 11, 2021. Oceans cover nearly 75% of the Earth. While they seem vast and frightening, they're also enchanting and whimsical. This hour, TED speakers dive into stories of connection — and even love — in the sea. Guests include adventurer Catherine Mohr, marine biologists Marah Hardt and Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and venom scientist Mandë Holford.
  • Many of us feel pressure to hit big life milestones on a timeline. But what if age is an asset, not a liability? This hour, TED speakers examine the benefits and drawbacks of being a late bloomer. Guests include writer Doree Shafrir, network scientist Albert-László Barabási, anti-ageism activist Ashton Applewhite and retired educator Riley Moynes. Listeners also share stories.

Web stories with video

  • LIDAR technology is an innovation in archeology and ecology that has uncovered lost civilizations. But archeologist Chris Fisher realized it could help track and study the effects of climate change.
  • Humans are generating vast amounts of data each day— and we're running out of storage space. Molecular biologist Dina Zielinski discusses a solution that can pack tons of data into a tiny space: DNA.
  • The internet is forever ... or is it? The average webpage is deleted or changed in just 100 days. To preserve all human knowledge — digital and analog — Brewster Kahle created the Internet Archive.
  • In 1989, CM Ralph created "Caper in the Castro", the first LGBTQ+ video game. Nearly lost when diskettes became obsolete, this piece of gaming and queer history found new life in the Internet Archive.
  • As facial recognition software becomes easier to acquire, businesses are using it to surveil and analyze customers. Bloomberg's Parmy Olson explains where and how the technology is being deployed.
  • We rely on technology for so much. Researcher Mike Seymour wondered: could our interactions be improved if tech had a face? He discusses how humanizing tech might make it more friendly and engaging.
  • Journalist Alison Killing explains her investigation in Xinjiang, China, where the government has used facial recognition cameras to track Uyghurs and detain them in camps across the region.
  • For most of her life, writer Doree Shafrir felt like she was always falling behind her peers. She describes how she finally came around to accepting – even celebrating – life as a late bloomer.
  • We receive a lot of messages about how bad it is to grow old. Anti-ageism activist Ashton Applewhite says that while some of our fears may be valid, aging offers more opportunities than we think.
  • Retirement is a time full of new possibilities — which can be exciting and intimidating. Retired educator Riley Moynes offers suggestions for how to find fulfillment in a new chapter of life.