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APM Reports

For generations, educators have fought about how kids learn to read and what that means about how they should be taught. Now, there is definitive evidence from neuroscience on how the brain learns to read and it suggests very different approaches to reading instruction than those that are commonly found in schools.

This APM Reports documentary explores why the reading science is not making its way into American classrooms – or teacher preparation programs – and what can be done about it.

Tune in on Sunday, September 23 at 7 p.m. on WRVO.

APM Reports

Apprenticeships are having a moment. Supporters on both the right and the left say the “earn while you learn” approach can help create a more skilled workforce, provide a path to solid, middle-class careers, and serve as a needed corrective to the “college for all” push that has left some students with piles of debt and no obvious career.

In this APM Reports documentary, we ask: How can apprenticeships expand to include careers beyond the traditional trades and reach new populations searching for a foothold in the middle class?

Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is set to face a second round of questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee today starting at 9:30 a.m. He's expected to be questioned about his views on previous Supreme Court cases, as well as a range of policy issues. Kavanaugh is also likely to be questioned about his work on Ken Starr's independent counsel investigation of former President Bill Clinton, and his time working in the White House under former President George W. Bush.

APM Reports

Mario Martinez and Katy Sorto were the first in their families to go to college. They started at community college in 2008 hoping to earn degrees, but the odds were against them. Both are from low-income families, they ended up in remedial classes, and they knew almost no one who had been to college. This APM Reports documentary tells their remarkable stories 10 years later and provides a rare window on the personal experience of trying to move up through education.

Join us Sunday, September 9 at 7 p.m. on WRVO.

Starting Tuesday morning, Senate confirmation hearings begin for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. The 53-year-old Federal Judge is President Trump’s pick to fill the spot left vacant by Justice Anthony Kennedy who retired in July. Democrats and Republicans are sharply divided over his nomination and the hearings will be a major political focal point in the months leading up to the midterm elections.

APM Reports

As part of a series on education from APM Reports, we're airing documentaries for the first four weeks in September on Public Radio Presents. For the first in the series, we ask if colleges help Americans move up into a higher socioeconomic class.

By connecting people across the world for free, platforms like Twitter and Facebook set the stage for a promising digital revolution, providing tools that helped foster global friendships, break down long-standing barriers that kept people and ideas from being heard, and served as the ultimate democratizing force for information.

Removing barriers to health

Aug 13, 2018
eltpics / Flickr

Health and wellness isn't a right for all people. For many of us, it's a privilege. Whether the issue is cost, transportation, resources or red tape -- many things can get in the way of living a long, health life. This time on "Take Care," we speak to people who are trying to remove these barriers.

#G7Charlevoix / Flickr

President Trump is holding a news conference at the White House with Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte. Conte has been in the office for a few months. His approach to government in Italy has been compared to that of Donald Trump in the United States. Italy has recently hardened its approach to immigration, for instance, and challenged European Union partners. Trump, for his part, has expressed support for Conte, at one point tweeting that "the people of Italy got it right!"

Watch live: The news conference will begin at approximately 2 p.m.

NATO North Atlantic Treaty Organization / Flickr

After weeks of headlines dominated by White House actions on the international stage, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will face questions from lawmakers Wednesday afternoon about how the Trump administration is managing foreign policy.

Live streaming video is expected to start at 3 p.m. this afternoon (below).

APM Reports returns with a three-part series in July and August. Join us starting Sunday, July 29 for "Order 9066: Japanese American Incarceration in WWII."

On February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, just months after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Some 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry were forced from their homes on the West Coast and sent to one of ten "relocation" camps, where they were imprisoned behind barbed wire for the length of the war. Two-thirds of them were American citizens.

the unnamed / Flickr

When we set out to put together this episode of "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show, we were told over and over again that there wasn't a lot known about the topic we wanted to explore -- the brain. The brain is infinitely complex. What we do know about the brain we've learned from neuroscientists, biologists and psychologists -- and they're continuing to make ground-breaking discoveries daily about how the organ works and what that means for our health and wellness. Needless to say, we took a stab at it anyway!

President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin sat down for a summit today in in Helsinki, Finland. This is the first stand-alone summit between the two leaders, and comes just days after an American grand jury indicted 12 Russian intelligence officers on charges related to Russia's interference in the 2016 election.

Is Bitcoin here to stay, or is it a bubble waiting to pop? Less than a decade old, Bitcoin is worth billions. The cryptocurrency promises to revolutionize global finance by placing control of currency in the hands of users, not nations, and make financial exchanges more transparent, efficient, and democratic. And it seems to be taking hold: Earlier this year both the Cboe and CME debuted Bitcoin futures. But is Bitcoin really a safe bet?

WRVO Public Media seeks a new morning news host to join our award-winning news team. The Morning Edition Host/News Reporter will serve as the local host for WRVO’s most important daypart, will write, prepare and deliver news and continuity during local portions of Morning Edition, and will contribute news reports and features as required.

Anthems can fuel patriotism, unite fans at baseball games, rally the troops or animate political movements.

For the next year, we'll unpack the elements of an anthem and ask what a song says about our diverse American communities as well as our collective soul.

Have you ever been to the Third Coast Institute of Sound? Probably not. It's a dreamed-up fictional museum where all of the exhibits and artifacts are dedicated to things that make sound and noise.

On this special, the history of the cat piano goes back centuries and raises unanswered (and perhaps unanswerable) questions about the relationship between music and noise, human and animal.

Celebrate the July 4th holiday and pick up a few new legal explanations from Rudy Guiliana when the "Capitol Steps" poke fun at today's news with a brand new, one-hour special.

Call your friends! Call your lawyer! Call your lawyer's lawyer! The special promises to be huge, fantastic, tremendous... the highest ratings ever, believe me. If there's anything both sides can agree on, it's that we all could use a good laugh. Tune out and tune in as the "Capitol Steps" rhyme the news of the day.

atelier PRO / Flickr

On the next "Take Care," we're exploring the health of our children. Looking at the issue from mental and physical perspectives, we hear from a variety of experts on the topic. It should be no surprise that today's youngest generation is growing up differently than the generations before them.

From WBEZ Chicago, Making Obama tells the story of Barack Obama’s climb from the South Side of Chicago to the national stage. Host Jennifer White talks with Obama’s key advisors, mentors, rivals, and the former President himself.

Part One: Obama’s years as a community organizer to his first elected office in Springfield, Illinois.

Part Two: Obama’s ill-advised run for Congress in 2000 to the moment he arrived on the national stage.

Negotiations can denuclearize North Korea. That's the statement two teams will debate in this week's "Intelligence Squared U.S." How should the United States respond to North Korea’s rapidly advancing nuclear capabilities?

Some experts suggest the upcoming summit between President Trump and Kim Jong-un might provide a pivotal diplomatic opportunity to persuade North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons -- especially in light of the announcement of harsh new sanctions.

The final year of World War II in the Pacific, told by men who came back and kept silent about the harrowing ordeal that changed their lives.

Accepting yourself: Aging and body image

May 17, 2018
Llima Orosa

This time on "Take Care," we take a look in the mirror (and, hopefully, a look inside ourselves). WRVO's health and wellness show is exploring body image, aging and acceptance this time around with a number of experts in these fields.

All Mom Radio

May 9, 2018

For Mother’s Day, maternal tales from producers around the country:

“Travels with Mom” follows Larry Massett and his mother to the Tybee Island, Georgia of today and of the 1920′s, as recalled by Mrs. Massett.

Writer Beverly Donofrio joins her mom for “Thursday Night Bingo,” produced by Dave Isay of Sound Portraits.

In Nancy Updike‘s “Mubarak and Margy,” a gay man returns home to care for his mom, and to the “cure” his family plans for his homosexuality.

And comedian Amy Borkowsky shares her hilarious phone “Messages from Mom.”

What if a single policy could impact American democracy, culture, and competitiveness?  What if that policy might either empower citizens and consumers, or burden them?  And what if the decision on that policy sparked a frenzy of legislative proposals, judicial challenges, and citizen outrage, all across the country?

Cindy Shebley / Flickr

On this episode of "Take Care" we're exploring addiction and the opioid crisis. It's a topic on the minds of health professionals, community leaders, elected officials and citizens across the country. Some cities and states have been hit particularly hard, others are working proactively to give their residents options for recovery. It's a complicated issue that we're looking at from a few different angles.

From BBC World Service's "The Compass," scientist Liz Bonnin offers a deep dive into the Earth's oceans. From Mauritius to Alaska, the Philippines to Cape Town, she shares stories of people who make a living from the sea and its wildlife, capturing the powerful ties that bind so many of us to the awesome majesty of the oceans.

Join us this Sunday, April 15 at 7 p.m. and again on April 29 at 7 p.m. for this two-part series in celebration of Earth Day.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is appearing on Capitol Hill for a second day of hearings about protecting its users' data. The House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing follows hours of questioning by lawmakers in the Senate.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is testifying on Capitol Hill to answer questions about protecting user data. We will have a live feed online this afternoon (starting at 2:15 p.m.) and tomorrow morning to cover any developments.

King's Last March

Mar 28, 2018

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Half a century later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

"King's Last March" includes interviews with some of the leader's closest colleagues and advisors, who reflect on the last year of his life, and the last protest movement of his career. It's a powerful and moving exploration of the final chapter of King's life that offers audiences reflection on the 50th anniversary of his death.

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